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Guys: I have a 2014 Impala LTZ (6 Cyl). I have 60K miles on it and the dealer wants $200.00 to change the transmission fluid, so I guess I'll do this myself. I guessing that a basic drain and refill will be enough. I'm also guessing that after I drain it I can refill it through the dipstick area. Does anyone have a picture of where the drain plug is?
 

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Don't have a picture of it, but if it is the same as the 12 models, the drain bolt is easily reached from the side of the car on the driver side just in front of the driver side tire. And yes, the fill is through where the "dipstick" is. Not like an oil dipstick as it has an opening more comparable to that of power steering.
 

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Thank you for the response. It seems straight forward, and I should be able to save significant bucks. Not sure why the dealer is charging so much. Do you recommend any type of fluid?
 

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Thank you for the response. It seems straight forward, and I should be able to save significant bucks. Not sure why the dealer is charging so much. Do you recommend any type of fluid?
The reason the dealer charges so much is that they use a machine to flush the complete system out and fill it. Just draining the fluid will only get about 2/3's out, the rest will remain in the torque converter. Unfortunately on these vehicles (most fwd vehicles) there is no way to drain the converter like RWD vehicles could be done in the old days.
 

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The last torque converter with a drain plug I saw was on a 1966 Chevy Biscayne wagon with a powerglyde. Had dozens of 70's and 80's rigs and they were sealed up just like the new stuff. 2/3 of the oil is more than sufficient if you do it on a regular schedule. The flush machines are a gimmick.

Use Dexron VI. I use the WalMart Supertech brand Dexron VI.

If it says Dexron VI it's licensed and tested by GM to meet spec. Stay away from products with the weasel wording "compatible with Dexron VI"... almost ain't good enough.
 

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a lot of the guys on here seem to go with about 30-40k mile trans fluid drains/re-fills on the 6 speeds. i've only read of one or two very rare trans failures in the time i've spent on these forums.
 

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my car was in my shop for something else and it was cold winter so i told him go ahead and change it. was about 100K and 80 bucks.

then i got one free change thrown in with my new rebuilt GM trans for $3800 at 140K so u could go that way and avoid a change at all :)

but i have a new 100K warranty on it so it was all worth it ..sigh
 

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a lot of the guys on here seem to go with about 30-40k mile trans fluid drains/re-fills on the 6 speeds. i've only read of one or two very rare trans failures in the time i've spent on these forums.
Me wonders what they did to em...
Maybe it's just that the gods don't like them or some past-life karma thing came back to haunt them...:lol:
 

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Me wonders what they did to em...
My take is that (on the new transmissions) they did a much better job of managing the steel filings that come off the gears over time. I'm guessing, in addition to the extra magnets, they improved the internal filtering - eg, a built-in Magnefine of sorts - and maybe re-positioned the various solenoids to be less exposed to the filings.

I believe the 4T65E was a joint venture with Ford, so I would expect that the Dearborn guys have had to deal with their share of warranty issues on their version.

That is, I'm sure there's been significant re-engineering going on in multiple locations :)

Doug

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If it says Dexron VI it's licensed and tested by GM to meet spec. Stay away from products with the weasel wording "compatible with Dexron VI"... almost ain't good enough.
Another perspective on this... Having dealt with some execs in the lube business, at least one of them expressed frustration with getting brand name specifications such as Dexron attached to their products - they felt like GM (or whoever) was jacking them up for licensing fees when it was a no-brainer to meet the spec/standard.

No doubt, if there is some engineering and test time required to qualify brandX's tranny fluid as meeting Dexron VI specifications, then it's reasonable to expect the supplier to pay for part of the testing and qual process.

OTOH, if all that's required to meet the Dexon VI spec is pouring a cup of Pyroil xyz stabilizer/anti-foaming agent/friction-modifier/etc into a 55-gallon drum of fluid, and it's well understood by industry experts, then I can see the case for using the "weasel words" :)

For example, Dexos seems to be the newest thing needed for motor oil in direct injection motors. And I'm sure there were some guys at Valvoline, Pennzoil/Quaker State, and the others all gritting their teeth when they saw the cost estimates for getting blessed to use the Dexos label.

Anyway, it was interesting to hear that from one of the lube guys when I asked him why his product label didn't declare itself "Dex-whatever certified".

Doug

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Another perspective on this... Having dealt with some execs in the lube business, at least one of them expressed frustration with getting brand name specifications such as Dexron attached to their products - they felt like GM (or whoever) was jacking them up for licensing fees when it was a no-brainer to meet the spec/standard.
It was the CEO of Valvoline, and not Dexron, it was the Dexos certification. GM is basically holding Oil suppliers that can meet or exceed the Dexos specs but do not want to pay ludicrous licencing fees just to have the logo on the bottle.

Having an improved specification is great, but charging the oil companies just to say it meets the spec is garbage, it only helps GM's pocket book while the extra cost is passed on to consumers. A great Corporate Scam is what it is.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-care/do-i-have-to-use-the-manufacturers-oil.html
 

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It was the CEO of Valvoline, and not Dexron, it was the Dexos certification. GM is basically holding Oil suppliers that can meet or exceed the Dexos specs but do not want to pay ludicrous licencing fees just to have the logo on the bottle.

Having an improved specification is great, but charging the oil companies just to say it meets the spec is garbage, it only helps GM's pocket book while the extra cost is passed on to consumers. A great Corporate Scam is what it is.

https://www.edmunds.com/car-care/do-i-have-to-use-the-manufacturers-oil.html


I disagree with you.

GM has developed specific oil requirement through their engineering and testing - which costs a lot of money. Use of the oil or fluid, including change schedules, ensures warranty compliance.

Some companies want to copy the oil specification for free, and then sell it cheaper than GM. The oil companies do not have the money invested in engineering and testing for the specific oil - they just want to make money.

MANY companies protect their intellectual property through testing and licensing. I’d suspect that GM randomly inspects and tests various products (such as oil and transmission fluid) to ensure it meets their standards.

I have purchased Dexos 1 oil through my dealer - from a friend that works in the part’s department. I have also purchased it at auto stores, and only buy stuff that is licensed and displays the correct logo - to ensure I am getting a high quality product. I only use manufacturer specific filters.

Although I have owned GM vehicles continuously for more than 40 years, my immediate family owns GM, Ford and Dodge vehicles. We ensure we use the correct fluids and filters.

Due to medical issues, I now must have many routine vehicle services done. I use the dealer for oil + filter + tire rotations, due to their reasonable cost. I know it is not the same as doing it yourself, which ensures that it is done right, but I have no choice.

People spend tens of thousands of dollars on a vehicle, then want to “cheap-out” on the cost of the oil. Many want to run to WalMart and buy the cheapest product, often made in China.

No me.
 

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GM has developed specific oil requirement through their engineering and testing - which costs a lot of money
Not as much as they are taking in from the Licencing fees, the development of Dexos was paid for eons ago.

The gentleman from Valvoline sized it up pretty well:

Rather than raise the price of its oil to offset the cost of licensing the Dexos name, Valvoline chose to forgo the license and keep the prices lower, he says.

"Smith says that GM's engine-performance warnings are part of its goal to drive consumers to dealerships for their maintenance. "We feel that they are taking choice away from the consumer," he says.

The following Valvoline motor oils meet or exceed the requirements of GM standard dexos 1™ Gen 2:

SynPower 0W-20, 5W-20, 5W-30
Durablend 5W-20, 5W-30
Full Synthetic High Mileage with MaxLife Technology 0W-20, 5W-20, 5W-30"

Many of Valvoline's oils meet or exceed the Dexos Standard, but Valvoline refuses to pay GM to put a Dexos label on the container.

The Society Of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and American Petroleum Institute (API) have never charged anybody for creating Standards, and until Dexos, nobody has ever been charged for meeting a specification, GM is just creating a Cash Cow for themselves. The Dexos Specification in and of it self is fine, but charging the oil companies to meet the spec is ridiculous.

In fact many oils met or exceeded the Dexos Spec before GM even created it, Mobil 1 for example. Dexos is a ploy by GM to get people to go to GM dealers, or pay extra for their licencing fees. The Dexos Program was defiantly born out of the GM Marketing department. Do not drink too much of the official GM KoolAid.

AGCO Automotive Repair Service - Baton Rouge, LA - Detailed Auto Topics - GM dexos oil, New Standard or Shakedown?
 

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I don't know about you, but personally, I'm not putting any oil in my car that doesn't have the *official* DexOS certification. Valvoline can *say* that it meets the specs, but they can *say* whatever they want. If you buy an officially-licensed oil, you *know* that it meets the specs.

I'd gladly pay a little more for oil that I *know* meets the specs. So, in my opinion, Valvoline is being penny-wise, pound-foolish - because there are a lot of people that won't touch it now (like myself) if it doesn't have the official certification.

GM has ongoing costs to make sure oil manufacturers with their DexOS certification are meeting those specs. I have no issue with them charing a licensing fee - there are TONS of products that do the same thing. It's a way to ensure a certain level of quality - and for something as important as engine oil, quality is important.

Just my two cents.
 

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I don't know about you, but personally, I'm not putting any oil in my car that doesn't have the *official* DexOS certification. Valvoline can *say* that it meets the specs, but they can *say* whatever they want. If you buy an officially-licensed oil, you *know* that it meets the specs.

I'd gladly pay a little more for oil that I *know* meets the specs. So, in my opinion, Valvoline is being penny-wise, pound-foolish - because there are a lot of people that won't touch it now (like myself) if it doesn't have the official certification.

GM has ongoing costs to make sure oil manufacturers with their DexOS certification are meeting those specs. I have no issue with them charing a licensing fee - there are TONS of products that do the same thing. It's a way to ensure a certain level of quality - and for something as important as engine oil, quality is important.

Just my two cents.
The GM Marketing Team applauds your decision and the
GM Accounting Department does too. It was exactly what they were counting on.:beer:

PT Barnum Once Said.................
 

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I think there is a lot of mis-understanding of what Dexos is.

It is not a Product, It is not a Brand, it is not a Recipe for oil, it did not take GM tons of research to come up with Dexos. Dexos is a minimum set of specifications that GM thinks is necessary for it's engines. Nothing More. Nor is it anything new, as all auto Manufacturers must specify what SAE Grade and API Service Grade must be used. The Current Grade is SN and exceeds Dexos Specs. Most all Synthetic Oils and Synthetic Blends met this criteria long before Dexos was even created. At best it keeps people from using non-Synthetic oil in newer vehicles.

But with some very crafty Marketing, and a real lack of explanation of what Dexos is, GM has convinced and confused people that they must use something that says Dexos on the Bottle or they will damage the engine or void the warranty, which is just not true. The reality is most Major Brand Companies changed nothing in their formulas as the SAE and API specs were already above Dexos guidelines, the only thing that changed was that they now had to pay a licencing fee to use the word Dexos on the bottle. Nothing more than a Word. GM does not test every oil makers oil to grant a licence, they just look at the formulation and grant a licence when paid for.

GM does not specialize in the manufacturer of oil or the technology that goes into the manufacture of oil, nor are they responsible for any of the advances that oil has made over the years. Those advances were created by the oil companies themselves along with The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). All GM had to do was set a requirement for the SAE Grade of Oil ie 5W-30, and set a API Service Requirement Grade, IE SM or SN instead of the Dexos Charade. It was truly designed to make GM more money more than anything else.

Delco purchases it's oil from any number of oil companies, that makes oil that just happens to meet the spec, could be Mobil (Mobil 1 was and still is factory fill for Corvettes long before Dexos), Pennzoil, Valvoline (which GM recommended for decades), Quaker State and numerous others. With exception of a few exotics, nobody makes oil that is for any one car, there is not a Dexos Mobil 1 and a Mobil 1 for all other cars, could you imagine if Ford said you could not use a Dexos labeled oil in any Ford vehicles. Dexos is more creative marketing than anything else, it helps insure that dealers get more business, and creates a new revenue source for GM with the Licencing Fees. extra cost is passed on to the consumer. I would have no issue with using Valvoline Synthetic or Synthetic Blend that had no Dexos Logo on it so long as it has the current SAE and API Service Grades.
 

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Good information on the DexOS specification and some of the benefits of this specification:

http://www.hankgraffbgc.com/Dexos1.pdf

I also noticed that Valvoline Full Synthetic oil *is* DexOS certfied - so I guess they think it's worth having that official designation after all...

Having the certiificaiton is a guarantee that the oil meets the DexOS specification - plain and simple.

It's up to you whether or not you feel it's worth getting products that have the certification - it's great to have choices. :) Personally, I feel better know that a particular oil has this certification.

It's no different than any other certification - it's a easy way for the consumer to know that what they are buying meets a certain specification.
 

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The GM Marketing Team applauds your decision and the
GM Accounting Department does too. It was exactly what they were counting on.:beer:

PT Barnum Once Said.................


I have owned and worked on GM cars (not professionally) for more than 40 years. I have always bought ACDelco or GM parts - including various filters, parts, fluids (at times), brake pads and other items.

I have found that the OEM parts and filters always fit perfectly and have consistent quality. MANY years ago, the aftermarket (USA made) part’s quality often were the same.

Now, with the poor-quality, made in China, parts everywhere - I stick to the OEM parts and filters. I have never felt that I was tricked into buying the items - I just had piece of mind knowing the item would fit and have consistent quality.

I know that an OEM replacement part can fail or be defective - but it is rare.
 

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Don't really know about the US but here in Canada the price for a jug of Dexos approved oil is the same as the non Dexos branded stuff and actually cheaper if there is a sale on.

As 1999 White C5 states.
Only time I have had issues with "new parts failure" is if I've purchased aftermarket stuff. Dorman/ BWD ( broke when delivered ) etc.
That being said, I've bought some Genuine GM/AC Delco stuff and opened it only to find it too is made from Chineseium.

smh
 

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Good information on the DexOS specification and some of the benefits of this specification:

http://www.hankgraffbgc.com/Dexos1.pdf

I also noticed that Valvoline Full Synthetic oil *is* DexOS certfied - so I guess they think it's worth having that official designation after all...

Having the certiificaiton is a guarantee that the oil meets the DexOS specification - plain and simple.

It's up to you whether or not you feel it's worth getting products that have the certification - it's great to have choices. :) Personally, I feel better know that a particular oil has this certification.

It's no different than any other certification - it's a easy way for the consumer to know that what they are buying meets a certain specification.
I'm reminded of this :D :

https://youtu.be/mEB7WbTTlu4?t=3

Doug

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