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While under the hood of my 2013 today I thought I would check My transmission fluid. I pulled the dipstick out and it was dry. I had about a half pint of dexron VI so I added that. Still dry. I bought a quart and little by little added the quart checking not to overfill. It is just barely on the tip of the dipstick now. I checked it with it hot, in park and running. Is this the proper way to check the fluid? There are no fluid leaks. I bought the car wrecked and It seems like I had to put a drive axle in it. Could that much fluid have leaked out when the axle was out?
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While under the hood of my 2013 today I thought I would check My transmission fluid. I pulled the dipstick out and it was dry. I had about a half pint of dexron VI so I added that. Still dry. I bought a quart and little by little added the quart checking not to overfill. It is just barely on the tip of the dipstick now. I checked it with it hot, in park and running. Is this the proper way to check the fluid? There are no fluid leaks. I bought the car wrecked and It seems like I had to put a drive axle in it. Could that much fluid have leaked out when the axle was out? View attachment 164042

Transmission fluid is often checked when hot (or at a specific temperature) - and with the engine running, with the transmission lever placed in park.

If you’ve done that - it sure sounds as though a significant amount leaked out when the axle was removed.
 

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Transmission fluid is often checked when hot (or at a specific temperature) - and with the engine running, with the transmission lever placed in park.

If you’ve done that - it sure sounds as though a significant amount leaked out when the axle was removed.
Yep, I did all the above. The only advice the owners manual gives is if your fluid is low take it to the dealership. I was a little disappointed by that.
 

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Yeah beware of letting your transmission run dry of fluid. I did that with my SS and had to replace the transmission. Replaced it with a remanufactured transmission instead of a rebuilt one after doing my research. What do you all think about the advice this article? My Transmission
 

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Yeah beware of letting your transmission run dry of fluid. I did that with my SS and had to replace the transmission. Replaced it with a remanufactured transmission instead of a rebuilt one after doing my research. What do you all think about the advice this article? My Transmission
I hope you know a remanufactured and rebuilt mean the same thing.
 

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I hope you know a remanufactured and rebuilt mean the same thing.
  • Rebuilt transmissions: Called “rebuilt” when the mechanic only fixed or replaced the worn-out (problematic) components of the system.
  • Remanufactured transmissions: Commonly referred to as a “reman”, remanufactured transmissions are considered as “new” because all the original equipment and components were worked on (replaced).
  • Reman transmissions are more reliable than rebuilt systems.
 

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  • Rebuilt transmissions: Called “rebuilt” when the mechanic only fixed or replaced the worn-out (problematic) components of the system.
  • Remanufactured transmissions: Commonly referred to as a “reman”, remanufactured transmissions are considered as “new” because all the original equipment and components were worked on (replaced).
  • Reman transmissions are more reliable than rebuilt systems.
While the definition of those words is different the outfits in the industry seem to throw them around as if they are one in the same.
The only way to get a remanufactured transmission is to take it to an outfit you KNOW you can trust to do it right. Those are damn hard to find nowadays.
 
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