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Discussion Starter #42
Seems that those single sockets "fits in the pocket". Next wave is blister packs with 6" cards.
Blister packs came to my mind, too.

The killer is, on a cost basis, for many products, the printed paper card/label and plastic pack can cost as much as the item(s) inside. I doubt that's the case for a socket, but such packaging can still be a significant adder.

Plus, for the retailer, a blister-packaged socket will take much more shelf space, on the order of 3 or 4x. So that's yet another negative.

Doug

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Discussion Starter #43 (Edited)
Screwdriver racks

I am not sure how helpful this is, but here goes, anyway. I decided to make a screwdriver rack rather than buying one, like are available for pegboards, for example. In this case, I'm talking about tool storage rather than tools, but I thought it still fit the thread topic.

I did this one in three tiers with the small ones on top, the most used ones in the middle, and the extra long ones on the bottom. The top two layers are straightforward with all the screwdrivers placed in ordinary holes. The bottom tier screwdrivers are long enough that pulling one out is akin to removing a sword from its scabbard, rather awkward and surely not something to be done in a confined space.

So I slotted the holes on the bottom rung, and also countersunk them to prevent the screwdrivers from sliding sideways and falling out.

I've had this up a couple years now, and I find it works fairly well. One improvement I can see would be to have somehow mounted this to the tool chest stack. That way, if the tool chest is rolled out, as might be done while working on a car, the screwdrivers would come with.

That said, for me, the big improvement was moving the screwdrivers nearer the garage door. Previously, they had been mounted on a pegboard sheet on the other end of the garage, requiring a walk across the room to fetch one. Having them next to the tool chests and near the door makes gathering tools much easier when I'm working on the car in the driveway.

Another change I'd make, if I had to do it over again, is that I'd shorten the struts on the top and maybe middle layers, so that they could be spaced closer together. There is some wasted (vertical) space there, for sure. An option to that, one which I could maybe still add, is to cut a u-shaped section which would fit around the top strut and be mounted between the top two levels. A few dowels would secure it in place. It would hold another 15 or so small/medium sized screwdrivers, altho they would be redundant, I think.

BTW, I think most of the material was clear poplar, but the back piece on the wall may be a piece of clear fir or pine.

Doug

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
Holiday gifts

With Christmas coming soon, this might be something to add to your wish list. I saw them at Sears recently when I went to pick up some sockets I had scored with one of their points rewards. I don't grill much, but I do find these appealing. In fact, I have a bottle opener with the same Craftsman screwdriver style handle.

And, with Sears' recent bankruptcy announcement, some tools like this might could go away, despite Craftsman being a Stanley product now. So act now, while the getting is good :)

Doug

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Discussion Starter #45
More gifts for Dad

After spotting these on the web, I requested and received a set for my birthday years ago. The fork has since met a horrific demise in the disposal, but I still use the spoon and knife :)

Google "wrenchware" for more info. The prices I saw today were in the 20 dollar range.

Doug

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Blister packs came to my mind, too.

The killer is, on a cost basis, for many products, the printed paper card/label and plastic pack can cost as much as the item(s) inside. I doubt that's the case for a socket, but such packaging can still be a significant adder.

Plus, for the retailer, a blister-packaged socket will take much more shelf space, on the order of 3 or 4x. So that's yet another negative.

Doug

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Just print cards that you take to the register to buy the individual small tools.
The downside is they need to have a runner to get the small tools to the registers.
The upside is card racks take up less shelf space and the sockets etc don't walk out the door.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Just print cards that you take to the register to buy the individual small tools.
The downside is they need to have a runner to get the small tools to the registers.
The upside is card racks take up less shelf space and the sockets etc don't walk out the door.
They do that at the drug stores now with cold medicines that contain ephedrine.

Reading this, the thought that sprang to mind was putting the individual sockets behind the counter sort of like some hobby shops do with rocket motors.

These both add a layer of inconvenience / cost , but either one could maybe make individual sockets sales viable again at Walmart. Of course, they'd have to move them up front with the cigarettes :)

[Edit]Or, like they do with cologne, as you indicated, send a runner out with a key to unlock the case in the tool aisle.

Doug

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Discussion Starter #48
When all else fails

I saw this on Facebook recently, and knew it had to be included here :)

BTW, I had a short stint in a truck shop one summer in college. I was surprised at how often the cutting torch gets used !

Doug

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Discussion Starter #50
¼" breaker bars

Does anyone use a ¼" breaker bar? A friend asked me that recently. At first, I thought he was being rhetorical. But after I thought a little more, I realized it's a legitimate question.

These are included in lots of socket sets. And I do use my ⅜" and ½" breakers, but I can't recall the last time I used the ¼". Sure, the ratchet gets used, and the finger bit is very handy, along with the screwdriver handle (not shown). But does anybody really need a ¼" breaker bar?

Doug

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Don't think I've ever even seen a small breaker bar like that, let alone used one! :) It's really not much bigger that the 1/4" drive ratchets...
 

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i feel weird using a 3/8 breaker bar, let alone a 1/4. i'd probably just use a 3/8 ratchet if possible or the 1/4 ratchet. i could see a purpose if you were working on small intricate parts maybe but personally i never find myself in that position.
 

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But does anybody really need a ¼" breaker bar?
Don't think I have ever used a 1/4 drive breaker bar. Most times that I have used a 3/8 drive socket where a bar was needed(which is rare), I have put a 3/8 to 1/2 drive adapter to be able to use my 1/2 drive bar. With that being said, I have used a 3/8 drive ratchet with a box end wrench over the end in awkward places I could not otherwise get leverage.
 

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It's a better weapon than a tire iron.... just sayin'
 

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I have to take the inner covers and high frequency start components out of my Miller 330 APB TIG welder. Miller decided it was a great idea to put nuts on the back of several fasteners in difficult to reach locations with low clearance. No way to get pliers on them and the 1/4" ratchets' head was too big.

Darn nice to have when you need one but it's rare.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Brake tools

These are brake tools for screwing the piston back into the caliper, for resetting the parking brakes on the rear of many recent models. They each require a 3/8" driver.

I bought the cube at Pep Boys several years ago to use on my 2007 Pontiac G6. More recently, I tried to use it on my daughter's 2013 Escape. Alas, it didn't fit. None of the 6 faces on the cube had the right spacing to fit into the brake mechanism (aka doololly). I found myself cursing the new grad engineer in Dearborn who couldn't design the new brakes to an existing standard so that new tools weren't required.

I can't recall where, but I picked up the two units on the right for about 35 bucks for the pair, IIRC. They were packaged together, else I would have foregone the 3-point tool.

One seemingly good feature of these is that they are adjustable. As the driver is rotated, the pins move in/out changing the spacing, allowing it to be adapted over a range of about 5/8" to 1-7/16".

But I didn't find that such a great feature. Normally, with the rigidly spaced cube, it's still a challenge to keep the tool square to the surface while applying non-trivial amounts of torque with the ratchet. That is, it tends to slip out of position and has to be re-inserted - several times, usually - while cranking the piston in.

The adjustable version slips out, too, which complicates the process further. Invariably, when it slips out, the spacing jumps, and you have to stop, re-adjust the spacing, test it, adjust it again, test it again, then finally insert it again, and start torquing...until it slips out yet another time :bang:

Anyone else ever use these? Was your experience similar?

Doug

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Discussion Starter #58
Servicing struts

With the price reductions seen in complete strut assemblies over the years, I'm sure many folks opt to forego the process of tearing struts apart in order to move the spring and other bits over to the new strut. But for those that are interested, here's what I use when dis-assembling/re-assembling struts.

It's a home-made sawhorse I've had since ~1990. It's hard to see, but there's a diagonal brace on each end. The extra 2x4 to which the strut is attached, is bolted to the sawhorse near the top and thru that brace.

Some 3/8" hardware is used to hold the strut to the 2x4. (The carpeting on the sawhorse is there from painting doors. It keeps the doors from getting scratched.)

With the strut attached to the sawhorse, I find this setup adequately stable for applying the spring compressors and for removing the big nut on top.

I can't recall many details, but I want to say that the first set of struts I ever replaced, I quickly found myself wrestling one on the garage floor. Needing both hands in some cases to work the tools, I was reluctant to wrap my legs around it to hold it steady - that compressed spring was way too close !! :)

So I cadged this together, and found it to be a much safer way to go.

HTH.

Doug

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Discussion Starter #59
Yeah, I have similar tools for brake pisons too. Last year, I went and bought a complete set of them, just so I always had the right tool going forward. I purchased this whole set, with a nice case for like $20:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Set-22PCS-Universal-Disc-Brake-Caliper-Brake-Piston-Wind-Back-Rewind-Hand-Tools/263442051605?hash=item3d565eb215:rk:1:pf:0

Haven't had to use them yet since I bought them, but when the time comes, I'll be ready! :)
That set is really nice, and the price - $22 - is incredible !

Doug

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Discussion Starter #60
Ultimate Crescent wrench

Here's one I just had to share :)

Despite what the caption says, I'm pretty sure one end is for tightening and the other for loosening :)

Doug
(Hoping this isn't a duplicate post.)

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