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Picked up this foot tire pump (Silme 20061A Big Foot Pump) for $20 good for 100psi.
I had a little 12 volt pump for the last decade but died , this little pump is well made





 

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Dropped a plug socket once , it never hit the ground , never found it:dunno:
 

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To be clear - I stole that from Facebook. I assure you, I would never admit to having that happen to myself :)

Doug

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If you've been turning wrenches for long one of those buggers is eventually going to disappear somewhere it's not retrievable. At least that little beast didn't migrate into the water pump or the heater core... OTOH ya hafta wonder if that was put there purposely to get by til the thermostat could be serviced and then just left there.

I dropped a flashlight in one of the curbside upright columns of a Flex Metro at the Bush garage in Baltimore back in 1997 or 98. There's another in a 91 or 92 Nova RTS in Jacksonville FL and one in a 78 GMC RTS and one in a NABI rear door column at LACMTA Division 7. I'm sure they were melted down along with the coach when they retired those fleets.
I know there's one of my nut drivers in the wall under the stairs on a Dennis Trident Double Decker in Kelowna, BC and another flashlight in a Decker in Victoria, BC.
I've dropped nut drivers and sockets and pliers down in various frame members and behind panels that can't be removed... never to be seen again. At least by me.:eek:
I've found a few tools in light racks and behind panels in the last 40 years as well.:beer:
 

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Discussion Starter #228
If you've been turning wrenches for long one of those buggers is eventually going to disappear somewhere it's not retrievable. <snip>
For me, it's usually fasteners rather than tools. I'll drop a nut or bolt that never hits the ground, and spend too much time trying to find it.

I'll use a magnetic pickup tool trying to probe hidden places. What I've discovered is that we need a magnetic tool that is only attracted to fasteners but not other ferrous materials such as frame rails and bulkheads :(

Doug :)

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Discussion Starter #229
Spring compressors - NOT !

One of these days, when I'm replacing struts, I'll post some pics of the tools I use to compress the springs. In the mean time, I'm posting this to show how NOT to do it :) (Courtesy of Facebook.)

BTW, I have bar clamps in my shop, but prefer to use them on wood, as intended :)

Doug

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One of these days, when I'm replacing struts, I'll post some pics of the tools I use to compress the springs. In the mean time, I'm posting this to show how NOT to do it :) (Courtesy of Facebook.)

BTW, I have bar clamps in my shop, but prefer to use them on wood, as intended :)

Doug

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lmao yeah he's going to love that board when it smacks him right between the eyes....wow
 

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Discussion Starter #231
I just returned from a road trip to the Fort Knox area. My Cruze's left rear tire has had a slow leak, and the tire store couldn't find it. So I was worried I might need to top off the tire while away from my air compressor. I actually stopped at Walmart just to see what I could find in the way of tire pumps. I didn't see one like this at the store I was at, but I did see a small electric (+12V) pump for less than 20 bucks. The label showed fill times for various items, indicating how slow it was :)

What I like about this one posted by Old Bones is that no +12V is required - ie, it's very simple to use, no cord has to be plugged in and routed outside of the car.

In the event someone has to use the donut spare, there's a very good chance it's close to flat. (BTW, I always top mine off as part of changing the oil.) With this foot operated pump, getting a donut spare up to proper pressure should be do-able without too much sweating. That is, I think a pump like this would be good to have in the survival kit in the trunk.
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BTW, while the tire store never found the leak, whatever they did servicing the tire resolved the issue. I never had to add any air during my 1800 mile trek. Kudos to the Firestone guys in next door Allen, Texas !

Doug

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After using a 12 volt pump for a decade it was very slow and was inconvenient at times. My snow tires are mounted on their own rims and loose pressure being stored for 8 months , now I can top them up before going outside to put them on. :beer:
 

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Dropped parts can surely eat up a lot of time. Lost a bolt and a socket in the skirt that goes under the front of the impala a few months ago, but luckily was able to retrieve both using a screwdriver to position the items and a flex 3 claw grabber to grab them. Unfortunately some are not able to be recovered with magnets. Carb jets are a good example. Learned a lesson here not too long back when tearing down the carb on our honda foreman 4 wheeler. Dropped one of the jets in pea gravel that was below the bench I was sitting on. Amazing how a part can disappear in 4 inches of rocks. Hours later after a 5 gallon bucket of pea gravel from the area it fell and then walking away to work on some other things went back and found the jet.

For those slow leaks and peace of mind, picked up one of these https://www.samsclub.com/p/1000-peak-battery-a-1000-peak-battery-a/prod20581005?sr=stanley back when sams had them for $49. Used the compressor to fill a tire on our durango not too long back and it did fine. Have one I keep in the car that is not quite the same, think it is 750 cca, compressor on that one has been used a time or two as well.
 
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Discussion Starter #236 (Edited)
Sears, Craftsman and Lowe's

On the subjects of Sears, Craftsman, and Lowe's, the first pic below strikes a nerve for me :) Surely home centers such as Lowe's and Home Depot have taken lots of business from Sears. When I bought my first house, besides tools, Sears was my go-to place for paint and all the accessories that go with - brushes, thinner, rolling pans, etc - as well as appliances.

Now I can get all that at home centers, as well as lumber, too. And, like Sears, they have credit cards. Plus, I drive by 3 Home Depots and 3 Lowe's on my way to the nearest Sears (all the way over in Mesquite, TX).

Anyway, in one pic, you can see both the past and the present. Not sure the future, but it might be an Amazon quad-copter carrying a gallon of paint, and a 10mm socket :)

The other pic (and the real reason for this post) shows two equivalent sockets - both Craftsman branded, 3/16", shallow, 6pt sockets with ¼" drive. One is on the shelf at Sears with a $3.48 price tag while the other is at Lowe's priced at $2.48, a savings of about 28%. It's not clear that all Craftsman tools will have the same savings - the similar 5/16" socket in the next bin was $3.48 at Lowe's, the same price as Sears. But if 28% becomes the norm, Lowe's will skunk Sears on pricing. I limited my comparison exercise to 3/16", since that's the one I needed. But I'll keep an eye on these trying to keep a handle on the various differences.

Continuing the comparison, there are differences in the part numbers and the features. The Sears Craftsman part has a tag marked 945802 while the Lowe's tag has several markings, none of which match the Sears part.

The Sears part is laser marked while the Lowe's part is stamped with "3/16" in easy-to-read characters. A quick, eyeballed comparison shows these characters to be nearly twice the size of earlier stampings (on otherwise comparable Craftsman pieces). I would rate the Lowe's marking as being as good or better than the laser for visibility. Sizewise, the parts are about the same, with the Lowe's piece being about 0.01" longer, almost imperceptible.

It's not clear if these differences will continue, or if maybe what I'm seeing is old stock at Sears and new stock at Lowe's. I previously stated in this thread that (I thought) Stanley had been making Craftsman for Sears, but I'm now re-thinking that. <conjecture> It may be that the differences seen here are old-supplier versus new-Stanley-supplied parts. Another thought is that stamping the sizes on the sockets presents a manufacturing cost savings, which will enable Lowe's to be more competitive. Home Depot sells their Husky version of this piece for $1.77 locally. Lowe's may get customers to step up to $2.48 for the more recognized Craftsman brand, but $3.48 - nearly twice 1.77 - can be hard to swallow. So reducing cost for Lowe's may also explain why their Craftsman pieces look different and have different part numbers. </conjecture>

It will be interesting to see if Sears eventually ends up with the same Craftsman parts, or if they continue with their slightly different pieces. Of course, first they have to stay in business to do either :)

Doug

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BTW, I saw this one at Autozone today for $14 + tax. Seems like a small price for a little extra security.

Doug

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I picked up one of these a couple of years ago and the one or two times i've used it i've been in love. you do need to run the vehicle because it has a large draw (motor of compressor runs faster/freely when vehicle on), but it can air up to a 31" tire. i figured it would reduce the amount of time the cheap 20 dollar unit i had from high school would take! LOL

Amazon.com: VIAIR 84p Portable Compressor: Automotive
 

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On the subjects of Sears, Craftsman, and Lowe's, the first pic below strikes a nerve for me :) Surely home centers such as Lowe's and Home Depot have taken lots of business from Sears. When I bought my first house, besides tools, Sears was my go-to place for paint and all the accessories that go with - brushes, thinner, rolling pans, etc - as well as appliances.

Now I can get all that at home centers, as well as lumber, too. And, like Sears, they have credit cards. Plus, I drive by 3 Home Depots and 3 Lowe's on my way to the nearest Sears (all the way over in Mesquite, TX).

Anyway, in one pic, you can see both the past and the present. Not sure the future, but it might be an Amazon quad-copter carrying a gallon of paint, and a 10mm socket :)

The other pic (and the real reason for this post) shows two equivalent sockets - both Craftsman branded, 3/16", shallow, 6pt sockets with ¼" drive. One is on the shelf at Sears with a $3.48 price tag while the other is at Lowe's priced at $2.48, a savings of about 28%. It's not clear that all Craftsman tools will have the same savings - the similar 5/16" socket in the next bin was $3.48 at Lowe's, the same price as Sears. But if 28% becomes the norm, Lowe's will skunk Sears on pricing. I limited my comparison exercise to 3/16", since that's the one I needed. But I'll keep an eye on these trying to keep a handle on the various differences.

Continuing the comparison, there are differences in the part numbers and the features. The Sears Craftsman part has a tag marked 945802 while the Lowe's tag has several markings, none of which match the Sears part.

The Sears part is laser marked while the Lowe's part is stamped with "3/16" in easy-to-read characters. A quick, eyeballed comparison shows these characters to be nearly twice the size of earlier stampings (on otherwise comparable Craftsman pieces). I would rate the Lowe's marking as being as good or better than the laser for visibility. Sizewise, the parts are about the same, with the Lowe's piece being about 0.01" longer, almost imperceptible.

It's not clear if these differences will continue, or if maybe what I'm seeing is old stock at Sears and new stock at Lowe's. I previously stated in this thread that (I thought) Stanley had been making Craftsman for Sears, but I'm now re-thinking that. <conjecture> It may be that the differences seen here are old-supplier versus new-Stanley-supplied parts. Another thought is that stamping the sizes on the sockets presents a manufacturing cost savings, which will enable Lowe's to be more competitive. Home Depot sells their Husky version of this piece for $1.77 locally. Lowe's may get customers to step up to $2.48 for the more recognized Craftsman brand, but $3.48 - nearly twice 1.77 - can be hard to swallow. So reducing cost for Lowe's may also explain why their Craftsman pieces look different and have different part numbers. </conjecture>

It will be interesting to see if Sears eventually ends up with the same Craftsman parts, or if they continue with their slightly difference pieces. Of course, first they have to stay in business to do either :)

Doug

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The closed out the Sears in the Fort Wayne area ( i think there may be one 30 minutes away in a small town....why not keep the one in the town with a quarter million population i can't understand...). i stocked up on most of my sockets/ratchets/breaker bars/wrenches when they kept coming up for pretty decent sales over the past 5 years on sites like slickdeals.net and what not. now that they've sold to stanley i'm happy that it went to an "american" company but bummed the sales are gone. i know the quality of the tool isn't what it was when my dad was buying these things in the 70's-90's, but i also know if i walked into the store i could exchange it out. being that i can walk into a lowes now and exchange it out for another piece (i asked a clerk there when i first saw them in the store and they said they do exchanges) i am happy that is still an option. this weekend i was leaving lowes and looking at all the tool boxes they had at the exit. their pricing feels like it came down reasonably from when i looked at them in the sears store. i'm really hoping stanley brings the brand back to some form of glory and keeps them competitive at the consumer grade level.

ps your signature fits me to a T....but they were all on sale dammit!! LOL
 
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