Impala Forums banner

201 - 220 of 289 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #201
10 or 14 mm

Seeking some inspiration, I drove over to one of the few remaining Sears stores here in the Metroplex, Town East Mall in Mesquite, home of the Mesquite Rodeo and Devil's Bowl dirt track.

Sometimes, just walking around the tool department will get my juices flowing and find me plotting my next project, or my next tool purchase :)

I've been looking for large (>24mm) metric deep sockets, wanting to fill in some gaps between 24 and 36mm. These are getting up into truck sizes - not that I'm planning to work on large trucks, but it doesn't hurt to be ready, just in case :)

Looking thru the display of individual sockets for that must-have tool I can't live without, I found the darling shown in the pic.

At first glance, I saw the 14 on the tag, then the business end which looked decidedly smaller than 14mm :) Studying it some, I saw 10 stamped on the body and 14 laser etched up a little higher :)

I'm wondering now if I should have bought this two-headed goat. But at the time, I was content to get a good pic :)

Theorizing how such a mix of markings could occur, I deduced that the stamping, 10, must occur fairly early after the basic socket has been formed, and (I think) before the chrome finish is applied.

For sure, the laser etch is applied after the chrome with the hang tag being close to the last step before shipping. The tag may even get inserted by the retailer rather than the manufacturer.

The point is that the 10mm stamping is in agreement with the size of the socket, and both of those are part of the early flow. Furthermore, typically in a manufacturing environment, a production run would be all the same size - ie, 10mm - there won't be any 14mm sockets, or any other size, mixed into the flow.

I assume that somehow, after forming and stamping, this piece got mixed in with another production run of 14mm sockets. That sort of makes sense - sometimes, a piece can fall off the track, then later get picked up and re-inserted in the flow, but, in this case, a flow of different sized pieces.

Once back in the flow, it got 14 lasered onto it and eventually received the matching tag.

Anyway, that's my theory and I'm sticking to it :)

Doug

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #202
Great deal at Sears on Craftsman ratchet wrenches

While I was shopping for sockets yesterday, I saw a display of ratchet wrenches that were on sale as shown in the attached pic. I failed to capture the price in the photo, but I thought it was $50. In this Sears link , they show $60. Even at that, it's very good deal.

It has 10 pcs of metric and 10 SAE. As I recall, I gave around 60 bucks for my 8-pc metric set (of these same models). This is 2½ that many wrenches, so it's a very good value!

The ratchets have fairly fine steps at 5° (72 steps per revolution) so they work reasonably well in tight places.

This set does not have switches for changing direction. Instead, the ends are flat - not canted like on many wrenches - so you just flip them over to go the other way. That's never been an issue for me. And, in fact, sometimes having the flat, uncanted ends is actually helpful.

Not sure how long this price is good, so get them while you can :)

HTH.

Doug

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #203 (Edited)
Shop cart / work bench

I saw this work bench at Home Depot the other day. It has a good size for a shop cart - 52"W x 24"D. Height is adjustable between 26 and 42".

It's not much for storage with two full-width drawers: one half-depth, one full-depth. But what I like about it is it has locking casters, so you can roll it right next to your work spot and lock it down without fear of it rolling down the driveway.

The top is a rugged slab, 1.2" thick. I might add a fence to it to keep tools from rolling off, but otherwise it seems like a very handy shop cart for spreading out on while working on the car. About 200 bucks.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-52-in-Adjustable-Height-Workbench-Table-with-2-Drawers-in-White-HOLT5202BJ1/307723266
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #204 (Edited)
Swivel/flex sockets

We have all had to remove that one nut or bolt that we couldn't get a straight shot at, and needed to go in at an angle. In my case, it was the #7 plug coil (COP) on my 1997 F150. The screw head was tucked under the fuel rail, and there was little space directly above the screw - I was forced to come in at an angle.

Fortunately, I had some swivel adapters including a ¼" unit which was ideal for use with a 7mm socket, or so I thought. With the socket attached to the adapter, it was too tall to fit under the fuel rail :(

But a dedicated 7mm swivel socket was about ⅜" shorter allowing access to the screw with a ¼" ratchet and extension. Easy-peasy. I don't even want to think about getting it out without that 7mm swivel socket. But it would surely involve some choice four-letter words :)

While having the swivel adapters is useful, investing in a few swivel sockets is money well spent. I only have a few, pieced together on a per-project basis it seems. But even at the premiun of buying one piece at a time, they've been well worth the money.

Over the years, I have picked up the key sizes of 10, 13, 15 and 18mm in ⅜" drive, and 7, 8, and 10mm in ¼" drive. Some I picked up at Sears, while others I got off the web, when I knew ahead of time what sizes were needed.

It seems nowadays these are a little more common, and can be purchased in sets at a reasonable price. A quick Google search ("3/8 drive flex socket set") turns up this 7-piece ⅜" drive Kobalt metric set at Lowe's for 35 dollars.

In addition to swivels, wobblers also allow off-axis access (ie, going in at an angle) but limited to smaller angles. I have a couple ⅜" extensions with wobbler ends on them. I have rarely needed them for their wobbler functions and usually just use them as extensions. One nice thing about them is that they insert to two different depths - partially inserted, they wobble; fully inserted, they function as standard extensions with no wobble.

One interesting piece I've added but never used is the ⅜" impact swivel adapter. It looked cool when I got it, but I can't recall ever using it, much less putting an impact wrench on it. One difference it has is that, instead of a U-joint, it uses a ball-and-socket design, sort of like a CV-joint. I can't imagine where turning a socket with constant velocity is ever needed, but it's still an interesting difference. And, it may be that the ball-and-socket construction tolerates the impact hammering better than a U-joint would.

As for the swivel spark plug wrench, I think I've only ever used it once or twice, but, given how well hidden some plugs are, we all know this can be handy to have.

HTH.

Doug

.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,441 Posts
Some new "tools" that I'm been buying lately - and really enjoying.... Worx products. I now have:

1. 18V weed eater (bought many years ago - still works perfectly)
2. 20V weed eater
3. 20V leaf blower (use to help dry off the car after washing too!)
4. 20V hedge trimmer
5. 20V circular saw
6. Pegasus work table/sawhorse
7. Worx SD Driver (cordless screwdriver)

I absolutely love these Worx products. They are very "handy" and I absolutely *love* the cordless aspect too. They all share the same batteries and I have a 1 hour quick-charger (have multiple chargers actually). I now have like 3 or 4 batteres - so always have a fresh battery when needed.

They aren't the cheapest tools around, but they are very well built and have some great features not found on other comparable tools. Highly recommened.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #206
½" Drive Metric Impact Sockets

I saw these on sale at Northern Tool this week. They are Klutch brand ½" drive, deep metric impact sockets, 14 pieces, sizes 10-19, 21, 22, 24 and 27mm, on sale for $32.99, normally $39.99. They come with a lifetime limited warranty, laser etching and a carrying case.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200624103_200624103

There was also a comparable 13-pc SAE set for $36.99.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200624100_200624100

I believe the Klutch brand is one of the Northern Tool store brands. For these prices, and with a lifetime warranty, they seem like good deals - surely worth taking a look at.

HTH.

Doug

.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,441 Posts
Just as a follow-up to those socket organizers I bought a while back (Ernst Socket Boss) - I freaking LOVE them. Everything is in it's place now and I don't have to look al over the house for my sockets. WHen I'm done, they go right back into their spot on the Socket Boss. Absolutely awesome - highly recommended!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #208
Independence Day

Yesterday I was at Lowe's - the new home of Craftsman - and spotted - what else? - this set of Craftsman screwdrivers on sale for 25 bucks.

It's an American rite of passage to buy a set of Craftsman screwdrivers, and I can't think of a better time to buy them than on Independence Day, open till 8pm :)

Seriously, this seems like a nice set. It has 5 slotted and 5 Phillips screwdrivers, plus is has a right angle screwdriver with Phillips on one end and slotted on the other. It also had a magnetizing and demagnetizing tool.

The right angle tool is pretty basic - nowadays there are other, more sophisticated right angle tools that can be power driven - but, in a pinch, a tool like this is still very handy, especially if it's the only right angle one in your set :)

The magnetizing tool I get. Just about any magnet can be used to magnetize a typical steel screwdriver. But I thought demagnetizing required a degaussing tool, something which employs AC current, or so I understood anyway.

As for needing these, if they both work, they can be handy. I've only ever needed a magnetized screwdriver 2 or 3 times that I can recall, but it can be helpful, especially if you have to reach into a tight spot with only one hand.

But I've also tripped over magnetized screwdrivers a similar number of times, and wished them ill will using choice words :) So the demagnetizing tool may also come in handy as well.

The price seems about right for a set with a lifetime warranty, about 2 dollars for each tool in the set.

Happy 4th of July to Americans reading this, and happy Thursday to everyone else :)

Doug

.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,441 Posts
That is a nice set of screwdrivers for the price. I like the large range of sizes provided (not just different sized "tips", but the size of the overall tool itself). A lot of times you just get 3 or 4 screwdrivers that are the exact same overall size with different sized "tips".
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,946 Posts
"One interesting piece I've added but never used is the ⅜" impact swivel adapter. It looked cool when I got it, but I can't recall ever using it, much less putting an impact wrench on it. "

Woo hoo!!!

Swivel on an impact,,,,,someone's gonna lose a tooth.

:D:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Well prime day pushed me over the edge.
I bought the Launch X431 Pro Mini Bi-Directional code reader.
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/Bluetooth-Professional-Diagnostic-DIAGNOSE-SERVICE/dp/B06XB93NCP/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=x431+pro+mini&psr=PDAY&qid=1563285497&s=prime-day&sr=1-2[/ame]
Looking forward to all the additional diagnostic tools I will have access to through this, as well as the features like key fob programing, or relearn procedures I used to have to go to the dealer for before.

I'll post back an update after using it for a while to see if it was worth the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
How much did they offer it for on Prime day ?
Got it for $629. I think it was 20% off...so about $60 lower than if you bought it today with that coupon. Wasnt a killer deal, but enough to make me pull the trigger.

So far I have used it to troubleshoot an evap code on my wifes suv. Found out the purge valve isn't working by commanding it to different percentages and seeing that the vacuum wasn't changing at all. Looked up the air bag code from my impala, and read the abs codes from my truck. I will be attempting to program a key for my wifes suv here shortly too. So far I love it. There is so much stuff that it does. I feel like I've barely scratched the surface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,002 Posts
Got it for $629. I think it was 20% off...so about $60 lower than if you bought it today with that coupon. Wasnt a killer deal, but enough to make me pull the trigger.

So far I have used it to troubleshoot an evap code on my wifes suv. Found out the purge valve isn't working by commanding it to different percentages and seeing that the vacuum wasn't changing at all. Looked up the air bag code from my impala, and read the abs codes from my truck. I will be attempting to program a key for my wifes suv here shortly too. So far I love it. There is so much stuff that it does. I feel like I've barely scratched the surface.
That could be the fuel tank pressure sensor as well.
Been there done that got the Tee shirt.

Sounds like it's a good diagnostic tool. Good to have known working options to the GM hardware and GDS software :eek:k3:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,441 Posts
Had to go buy a Torx E-12 socket today (female Torx socket). I am installed an under-the-seat subwoofer in my Challenger and of course, they have to use these oddball bolts to secure the seat... At first I used a 12-point 3/8" socket, but I then wasn't paying enough attention and somewhat stripped the 2nd one - which is why I had to go buy the real thing - the E-12 socket. I was eventually about to get the somewhat-stripped bolt out with the E-12 socket. But what a PITA... Why can't they just use regular bolts???

Oh, at least I now have a female Torx socket that I'll probably never use for anything else every again. :) Lesson learned - buy the right tool for the job instead of trying to use something that is "close". :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Discussion Starter #219
Had to go buy a Torx E-12 socket today (female Torx socket). I am installed an under-the-seat subwoofer in my Challenger and of course, they have to use these oddball bolts to secure the seat... At first I used a 12-point 3/8" socket, but I then wasn't paying enough attention and somewhat stripped the 2nd one - which is why I had to go buy the real thing - the E-12 socket. I was eventually about to get the somewhat-stripped bolt out with the E-12 socket. But what a PITA... Why can't they just use regular bolts???
I think there are a couple advantages. On the assembly line, some things are done one-handed, so the worker is holding a tool - eg, air wrench - which has a socket on it, with the fastener inside that. I think a torx-headed fastener may be easier to keep perched in the socket without falling out more readily than a normal hex bolt, which in turn allows the assembly worker to reach into some recessed, hard-to-reach spot and run the screw in without needing to have his other hand on the screw to keep it in position.

The other advantage is that, for its diameter, I think the torx head can take more torque. So the fastener's head can be a bit smaller making it easier to fit it into tight spots.


Oh, at least I now have a female Torx socket that I'll probably never use for anything else every again. :) Lesson learned - buy the right tool for the job instead of trying to use something that is "close". :)
I think these may be the new trend. (Keep in mind, 100 years ago, somebody made the same comment about his first Philip's screw driver :) ) My 2 Cruzes have a bunch of female torx fasteners. So hang on to that E-12 - you're gonna need it again :)

BTW, my Father's Day / birthday trick worked - I got that 13-pc set of female torx sockets whose pic I had texted to my wife/kids :)

Doug

.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,441 Posts
Damn it, Doug - there you go applying logic to things again!! :) Of course, your explanations make complete sense... :)

Funny story.... So I look everywhere on-line to try and find this female Torx socket, which I assumed was an E-10 since it had a "10" clearly stamped on the head. My local AutoZone didn't have any, Walmart didn't have any and Lowes didn't have any (at least according to their web sites). So I find one at an Advanced Auto about 25 minutes away. I get in my car, get to the store and couldn't find it. I asked the people that work there and it wasn't even in their system. So I say, OK - I'll just order it online for pick-up in "30 minutes" - I'll *make* them find it! I order it online from my phone while in the store and when I get the confirmation email, I realized that I was at *AutoZone* instead of the Advance Auto a half mile up the street that I was *supposed* to go to! <sigh> - don't I look like an idiot!!!

It gets even worse...

So I leave AutoZone and go a half mile up the street to Advance Auto, where I've now ordered it on-line for in-store pickup. They fine the E-10 socket and give it to me. As I'm walking to my car, I remembered that I brought the bolt with me, so I "test" fit it and sure enough, the socket (E-10) is too small. I go back into Advance Auto and the guy says "it's probably and E-14" - give me an E-14 and it fits, but as she's exachanging it in the computer, I realized that while it does fit, it's a little loose. So I ask to check an E-12 and sure enough - it fits perfectly. SO then the poor lady had to exchange it yet *again*!

Man - sure was a lot of work getting that little socket.

To make matter even worse, while looking for the "E-10" at the original Auto Zone, I found a 9-piece female Torx bit set for $22 (the single was $5). My cheap ass puts the set back to go get the $5 single bit at the right store.

Long story short - I should have just bought the damn 9 piece set at Auto Zone and called it a day!!!!!
 
201 - 220 of 289 Posts
Top