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Discussion Starter #1
Sitting at 104,000 miles so I started the recommended maintenance last week with a normal oil change. I also ran some GM intake cleaner through the intake and dumped a can of Seafoam into the gas tank and filled it up. The intake cleaning was simple. I disconnected the hose at the back middle of the intake and used an IV style bottle and hose to slowly let it suck into the engine
I idled the engine at 2000 rpms while I did this. I used a pool stick wedged between the seat and gas pedal. I got a can of CRC intake cleaner designed for direct injection engines and I will do this one day this week or next weekend. I am going to order AC Delco stock replacement plugs since the local parts stores want a fortune for them.

Today I drained and filled the coolant. On the radiator on he lower passenger side, there is a white plug that you loosen and the coolant will drain from the bottom of the radiator into your drain pan. So what I did was drain and fill with water until the water was running clear. I also removed the overflow container and cleaned it out. There are 3 nuts securing it to the inner fender, 2 up top and 1 on the bottom sorta hidden. I removed the front half of the air intake to give my large hands enough room to get a wrench on the nut. All you do is loose it enough the pull the bottle up and out. I refilled the coolant with Peak long life coolant since I had a gallon left over from the water pump job on my Yukon. So I went and bought a gallon of concentrated coolant and a gallon of distilled water to give me 3 gallons of new coolant. At one point, I was idling the car while pushing the old coolant out and new coolant in... don't do this if you get easily distracted... I put almost 2 gallons of new coolant in so I may drain and fill again just to make sure all of the old Dexcool is out. I have 8 gallons of old coolant to take to the recycling center at some point this week.

So long story short, oil change, coolant drain and fill, intake cleaning and then new spark plugs to follow and that is it. Belt still looks good and the trans fluid looks good and it better, since it has been drained and filled 3 times so far during my ownership. I will probably do the power steering fluid and the brake fluid will get flushed when it is brake job time.

If anyone plans on doing any of this stuff and you have questions, just ask. I chose to use Peak extended life coolant because I have used it in other Dexcool vehicles I have owned and have not had one problem with it. It is also cheaper, especially at Harbor Freight or Dollar General. I wouldn't go with anything but AC Delco on the spark plugs.
 

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If you have not already done it, would add a trans fluid drain and change to your list there.

Used autolite iridiums on the first plug change on our 2012, at around 100,000 miles. The factory plugs were not bad at all. Changed plugs again not too long back, had about 60,000 on the autolites, went with bosch iridiums. Depending on how the bosch plugs last may go back with the factory plugs next time around, should have our car around 250,000 miles by that time.
 

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Be sure to run the ABS bleed from your scan tool when you do the brake fluid flush. It's just a procedure that exercises the ABS motors in a specific sequence to flush out the cruddy stagnant fluid. I believe it's in the Tech 2 ABS Special-Functions menu under Automated Bleed.

I do it when I swap brake pads as well.

Whomever owned my trucks didn't do it when they worked on the brakes. When I got em they had mushy feeling brake pedals.
I used it as a bargaining chip even tho I was pretty sure it was a quick fixit job with the Tech 2. I fixed the last one before I left the car lot and I flushed the pitch black fluid as soon as I got home. I ran it again twice mid-flush to get that nasty rusty fluid out.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you have not already done it, would add a trans fluid drain and change to your list there.

Used autolite iridiums on the first plug change on our 2012, at around 100,000 miles. The factory plugs were not bad at all. Changed plugs again not too long back, had about 60,000 on the autolites, went with bosch iridiums. Depending on how the bosch plugs last may go back with the factory plugs next time around, should have our car around 250,000 miles by that time.
I have done 3 trans fluid drain and fills... roughly 30,000 miles apart... probably due in another 10k or so. When Autozone puts the Castrol Dex 6 on sale I will buy it.

I'm just gonna use the AC plugs when I replace them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Be sure to run the ABS bleed from your scan tool when you do the brake fluid flush. It's just a procedure that exercises the ABS motors in a specific sequence to flush out the cruddy stagnant fluid. I believe it's in the Tech 2 ABS Special-Functions menu under Automated Bleed.

I do it when I swap brake pads as well.

Whomever owned my trucks didn't do it when they worked on the brakes. When I got em they had mushy feeling brake pedals.
I used it as a bargaining chip even tho I was pretty sure it was a quick fixit job with the Tech 2. I fixed the last one before I left the car lot and I flushed the pitch black fluid as soon as I got home. I ran it again twice mid-flush to get that nasty rusty fluid out.
My scan tool doesn't scan ABS codes let alone bump the ABS module to flush the fluid. But let me ask you this... I have been told that leaving the ignition key in the ON position keeps the ABS pump valves open and when you flush the brake fluid, it will flush the ABS system as well. I know that when I have had a stubborn car that wouldn't bleed well, I have turned the key to the on position and gotten it to finally get a stiff pedal.

This also worked when I replaced the brake lines from the ABS module to the rear diff in my Yukon. I couldn't get the system bled well enough until I turned the key on and finally got it going... it has been at least a year and the brake pedal is still rock solid in it. Thoughts?
 

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The right Bi-Directional scan tools can tell the ABS computer to activate the impluse motors in a specific sequence. They're well worth having for other reasons but this is one.

I've tried that key on and bleed method on several second revision 95 and later GMT400 trucks before I bought AutoEnginuity GM extensions, back when they didn't cost a mint. Shortly after that I bought my Tech 2 Clone direct from China. AE has come a long way... but it's not inexpensive anymore and the coverage can be spotty on stuff you suddenly need.

If you can make the key-on and bleed method work well enough for you that's great. I figure there's probably air trapped in that rats nest that'll bite me someday if I don't exercise it properly. Your rig so do what gives you warm fuzzies.

Supposedly some of the mid and low end Launch and Autel products will do this on Domestic vehicles.

The WiFi MDI full clones are pretty cheap now. Hacked copies of Tech2Win work on the earlier rigs and GDS on the later ones for personal vehicles. You can flash modules with the latest GM calibrations without a trip to the dealer... You need a Delco TDS subscription but it's not terribly high priced for an individual.

If I were doing this professionally I'd look into the higher end Autel or Launch or even Snap On or OTC products. I could write the cost off my taxes somewhat in that case.

One size doesn't fit all even with the mandated conformity of OBD II and CAN. Guys that do this every day have several tools in their arsenal because one will do some things better on some rigs than the others and some will not do certain operations at all even tho they are supposed to. :dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have been eyeballing the Autel at Harbor Freight but sneaking that $800 past my wife for something I won't use every day is going to be a bitch... one day hopefully.

It isn't so much the warm fuzzies as is the solid brake pedal after bleeding. One of the older techs in the shop I worked at taught me that and to this day, I have not had an issue with it. It may not work for the latest newer cars out there, but it has worked when one person gravity bleeding, one person pressure bleeding, and the 2 person pump the pedal and hold methods have not worked. When I get to the point of flushing it I will post my results. As of now I am still on the factory rotors and pads but I would guess it will be time for replacements before too long.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Did you replace your spark plugs and did you have to remove the intake manifold to get to the rear plugs?
I haven't gotten to it yet, but I am going to order them today. I found them on Ebay for $20 for all 6, and they are the original AC Delco replacements. I should have them in time for next weekend. Been busy with kid swim meets and car shopping for the wife so not much time for myself lately. Swim meets are slowing down now and I finally found an Acadia for my wife, so now I can get some things done.

And as 99 White C5 Coupe has posted in that thread link, removing the intake manifold is optional, not required. If you have patience and have the right combination of extension bars to use on your ratchet and spark plug socket, you can give yourself enough clearance to remove the spark plugs in the rear with the very limited space you have to work with. On the flip side of this cheat, removing the intake is not difficult and the advantage of doing this besides easy access to the rear plugs is that you can clean the oil and crap out of the intake and get a look at your valves and see how badly they are carboned up from normal DI engine operation. You can then decide to try to clean them up or let it go for another time.

My plan was to not remove the intake and just replace the plugs as is. I have already run some GM intake cleaner through the engine and I am going to Seafoam it and then use a can of CRC intake cleaner designed for DI engines on it before I replace the plugs. I have 2 years of payments left on it and I plan to hold on to the car for a while, especially now that I just bought my wife a 2016 Acadia Denali. I don't need 2 mega car payments and between my Impala and my 04 Yukon, I am good. Eventually the Impala will need brakes and struts and whatever else might be wearing out in the suspension so I am planning for that all in 2020.
 

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Spark plugs showed up today... $20 and free shipping certainly beats $8.56 a piece at AutoZone! Hopefully I can install them this weekend. The plan is still to not remove the intake manifold. My weekends are going to be short as Christmas gets closer... something to do with packages and brown trucks delivering them always tends to go apeshit at Christmas...
 

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^ How'd you get 3 gal. of coolant out of 1 gal. of concentrate and 1 gal. of distilled h2o? Lean mix less than 50/50?
 

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^ How'd you get 3 gal. of coolant out of 1 gal. of concentrate and 1 gal. of distilled h2o? Lean mix less than 50/50?
I had 1 gallon of unopened 50/50 mixed, so I bought 1 gallon of concentrated Peak and a gallon of distilled water... that gave me 3 gallons to fill it with.
 

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And out with the old and in with the new. This was super easy to do. I have a magnetic 5/8 spark plug socket which always makes plug replacements like this worry free. DO NOT drop the plug into the well like the video shows... you are asking for trouble. Per my own judgement, I did check the gaps of the plugs and I am glad I did as one was off. I also dabbed a very small amount of anti seize on the threads as well. The rear plugs were a breeze. You will need to spin the coil bolt hole to the firewall to finagle the coil pack out. Also, a regular 6" and 3" extension on the middle and right side plugs will give you plenty of room to break them loose and tighten them up. I did not torque the plugs. I hand tightened them until snug and then gave them a slight tug to finish. 15 foot pounds is not very tight. I have never had a problem on any spark plug job I have ever done doing it this way. 30 mins start to finish.
 

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^+1. I'd never drop the new gapped plug down the hole. I place a scrap piece of rubber vacuum or fuel line hose over the top of the new plug and lower it down the hole. Turn the hose cw 'til it starts slipping on the plug and then you're ready for the socket/ext./ratchet. Avoids cross-threading.
 

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They say never gap these plugs, but it seemed my AC Delco Iridium plugs could use some to me when I did it. My car has never been as smooth at idle since changing those rear 3 plugs 1 year ago and I swapped the plugs around too. Maybe one of those hoses have a tiny leak now.
 
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