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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 07 impala LS 3.5L NON flex fuel.
My ac compressor wont budge its F.U.B.A.R.(its german ;) )
i want to fix it but i dont have the time to money to replace the compressor at this time.

SO
what belt size would i need for bypassing the compressor?
would it be dangerous to get a used compressor or is that TOO risky, how likely am i to pull a broken one out? Mine has NEVER worked in my car as long as i have owned it just flashing and i could hear the liquid sounded low, i assume that was probably part of the problem. its been sounding funky for days. sounding like a bad pully, but all the rest are free spinning and dont make that god awful sound.
 

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I have a 07 impala LS 3.5L NON flex fuel.
My ac compressor wont budge its F.U.B.A.R.(its german ;) )
i want to fix it but i dont have the time to money to replace the compressor at this time.

SO
what belt size would i need for bypassing the compressor?
You can't re-route the belt on a 3.5L V6. The AC compressor is actually an idler that allows the belt to run the water pump in the opposite direction from the other accessories.

would it be dangerous to get a used compressor or is that TOO risky, how likely am I to pull a broken one out? Mine has NEVER worked in my car as long as I have owned it just flashing and I could hear the liquid sounded low, I assume that was probably part of the problem. its been sounding funky for days. sounding like a bad pully, but all the rest are free spinning and don't make that god awful sound.
The awful sound is probably the compressor clutch idler bearing failing. That part spins even if the compressor is seized. The idler pulley and bearing can be replaced independently from the compressor.
It's a fairly simple task as long as you can get access to the pulley end of the compressor.
You can probably pull the compressor loose from the mounts and swap the clutch without taking the AC hoses off the compressor.

If the compressor is seized you can still replace the clutch and bearing assembly and then re-install it as an idler pulley.


Honestly, if the AC system has had humid outdoor air in it for more than a few months it's FUBAR.

Here's why.
Outdoor air has Humidity and refrigerant oils will extract water from the air lickety-split... just like brake fluid. Water will make a weak acid when combined with all refrigerant oils. That cruddy oil will have to be removed from the system and the condition of the aluminum parts that were exposed to the corrosive crud will need to be assessed.

If you want to fix it...
IMHO The only way to reliably fix it would be to find a wrecked Impala 3.5L with an AC system that's still under pressure and buy the AC system off that rig lock stock and barrel to replace yours. The yard will properly evacuate the system before you or they pull the parts.
Once you get the parts you need to flush everything but the compressor out to get rid of any refrigerant oil, dump out the old compressor oil charge, buy a new drier, buy several ounces of Ester oil with UV dye, Re-fill the compressor with new dry oil (you may want to fill it and drain it once to flush out any crud), install the components, and sweep the system with nitrogen, helium, or argon. Welding gasses like those three are dry and not refrigerants so you will not get fined and put in jail for sweeping the air out of the system with them.
Most of us ******** have a tank of Argon for the welder.
I usually sweep the system out, vacuum it down and leave it overnight to test for leaks, and then I pressurize it with Argon welding gas til the LPCO trips to test the system for leaks again. The point is to get the humid air out of the system immediately after you close the last fitting.
DO NOT EVER SWEEP THE SYSTEM WITH REFRIGERANT. Some jackwagon will turn you in for venting refrigerant and the EPA will fine you and possibly put you in jail.
Once it's closed up and clear of humid outdoor air you can get a shop to vacuum it down or do it yourself and re-fill it...

Most rigs aren't remotely worth the expense to fix an AC system that's been left open for too long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You say left open? Meaning like broken or a fitting ? I don't know jack shit about the AC system all I know is when I start the car I can hear water sloching sound in the dash, and the AC compressor idler will not turn already snapped 2 belts. Used to be fine with loud notice now it's just nope ..gone.

Could I JUST replace the compressor and then refill it? Seems like all the lines APEAR to be intact
 

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Do yourself a big favor and check the freon filter (attached image). If the screen is completely clogged, you cannot just replace the compressor and add freon. The new compressor will seize again. You need to get parts from JY that haven't been opened to air. I don't know the exact location of the filter in our Impala. It should be in the high pressure line between compressor and evaporator. There should be a clamp with bulged aluminum tube. The filter is right there. YOu will need a tool like the image. Good luck.
 

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You say left open? Meaning like broken or a fitting ? I don't know jack shit about the AC system all I know is when I start the car I can hear water sloching sound in the dash, and the AC compressor idler will not turn already snapped 2 belts. Used to be fine with loud notice now it's just nope ..gone.

Could I JUST replace the compressor and then refill it? Seems like all the lines APEAR to be intact
Any leak leaves the system open to the atmosphere and ambient humidity.
That's really very bad for the internals of the AC system.

If the compressor is locked up from wear or corrosion or whatever else the AC system on the car is not salvageable.

As I said... you can replace the clutch and bearing assembly on a seized compressor. The belt will run for thousands of trouble free miles using the new compressor clutch as an idler on a completely seized AC compressor.
 

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Those by-pass pullys are $39 bucks and up at several parts stores and flea bay.

I wish I could find a comp. clutch and idler bearing as cheap!
How long do they last and how well does it hold the belt alignment for the long haul at that price point?

I've had stock AC compressor idler bearings last well past 200,000 miles.
I Just did a quick-n-dirty search on Car-Part.com--Used Auto Parts Market. A used AC compressor off a wrecked Impala can be had for $20 with an idler bearing that'll likely hang together for a lot longer, and belt-track better, than the $39 part made by China Inc. :beer:
 

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How long do they last and how well does it hold the belt alignment for the long haul. A used AC compressor off a wrecked Impala can be had for $20 with an idler bearing that'll likely hang together for a lot longer, and belt-track better, than the $39 part made by China Inc. :beer:
The guys car is broke and undrivable and has limited funds.

So what is the easiest way out?

Waiting for the UPS truck bringing the by-pass pully to the door
OR hitchiking to the pic a part to remove a unknown used
compressor to replace the seized unit?

I know what I would do in a low funds/broken car situation!
 

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The super duper expensive AC clutch and bearing assembly is... wait for it... $53. Dang that's expensive isn't it... LOL
That $53 is well more than I'd pay if I were strapped... OTOH there's no way in hell I'd pay $39 when I could buy a used compressor with a working clutch and bearing with a 60 or 90 day warranty for $20 that will probably outlast the car.

Car-part.com allows you to be an informed consumer. You can even search "only local" yards using them.

Wake up and smell the gear oil folks. Carnies run the salvage game. To the Carnies in this game, you're the mark or the rube.

Many times the prices for parts in U-pullit yards, where you do all the work to pull parts off their high mile pigs, are even higher than the over-the-counter yards where they do the work to pull the parts from lower mile wrecks. The U-pullit Carnies plan on folks assuming they are cheaper because of the rubes' sweat equity. Don't be the rube.
 

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Sheesh.................Why not BUY a new compressor for $133 bucks then? Along with a new $30 drier and a $15 can
of line cleaner along with a $8 pack of O-rings and a filter.

Clean and evacuate the a/c lines and do a 134 recharge?

My Z-28s comp. locked up and this is how I did my repair.
But I do have a fully equipped garage with air, tools and shop/ backyard experience.
I have frosty (as far as a 134 conversion vs. factory r-12) a/c allows.

But the OP has LIMITED funds and a UN-DRIVEABLE car.............

You forgot to add the price of special TOOL to remove the clutch also into your $ figures.
 

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As you stated he has no funds to do this... Fixing the AC system is out of the question without funds.

He doesn't need a special tool to pull the dead compressor and install a used $20 replacement. The beautiful thing is the compressor doesn't even have to work just the idler. At $20 who bloody cares if the compressor works.

His AC system is already open to the atmosphere from whatever accident physically damaged it so there's no illegal refrigerant venting either.

I saw Various refrigerants used to replace R12 in the 90's. R152a works extremely well with the Harrison R4 your Z28 likely has. If you have an older 70's Z28 they probably had the Harrison A6 and there's no excuse for poor performance on R134a using that beast. My 1976 Chevy K20 had a Harrison A6 compressor before I converted it to Diesel. I properly flushed it and converted to R134a. It would literally turn the interior into a refrigerator. Vent temps were in the 35-37°F range when charged using the JungleEddy method. I did add a High-Pressure Cutout Switch in the high side line off the compressor using a braze in bung. The compressor head pressures were well within allowable ranges even at roughly 100°F outdoor ambient temps. I checked several times because I thought the HPCO switch wasn't working.
 

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Sheesh.................Why not BUY a new compressor for $133 bucks then? Along with a new $30 drier and a $15 can
of line cleaner along with a $8 pack of O-rings and a filter.

Clean and evacuate the a/c lines and do a 134 recharge?

My Z-28s comp. locked up and this is how I did my repair.
But I do have a fully equipped garage with air, tools and shop/ backyard experience.
I have frosty (as far as a 134 conversion vs. factory r-12) a/c allows.

But the OP has LIMITED funds and a UN-DRIVEABLE car.............

You forgot to add the price of special TOOL to remove the clutch also into your $ figures.
While I agree that fixing it right the first time is best, it isn't always the cheapest. I don't recommend DIY AC repairs to anyone that doesn't know what they are doing. Read a post on the GTO forum a long time ago where the guy went to charge his system with a store bought refill can and it damn near exploded on him. This being said, with money being an issue, I agree with Hatzie... Buy a used compressor for cheap... As long as the idler spins, it is good to go until the summer comes and he wants his AC working. Then he can decide if he wants to spend the money or not. Replacing the compressor is straight forward and will get him by if he can do it himself.
 
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I have the GM service training manuals for AC systems Circa 80's & 90's. If anyone wants a copy wander over to my service manuals post on the 67-72 Chevy trucks board 73-87 forum.

They run on for 300-500 pages or so. Nowhere near as simple as some folks would like to think.
Not as difficult as some others would say either but you have to be aware and careful. Slapping a Borg charge-it can in a system that doesn't work is asking for trouble.
 

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Living in Fla I have seen many r-12 replacement ba*tard gasses used in r-12 system repairs.
I have also seen many r-12 to r-134 retrofits to boot. Like my Z.


I waS smart for picking up some 30 pounders of r-12 for less than $100 each.
Saved my behind and money repairing and charging the many compressors in my
bar/rest/motel operations.


Conversion sticker Underhood on my Z-28: Done by a shop in NC.
 

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I have a 07 impala LS 3.5L NON flex fuel.
My ac compressor wont budge its F.U.B.A.R.(its german ;) )
i want to fix it but i dont have the time to money to replace the compressor at this time.

SO
what belt size would i need for bypassing the compressor?
would it be dangerous to get a used compressor or is that TOO risky, how likely am i to pull a broken one out? Mine has NEVER worked in my car as long as i have owned it just flashing and i could hear the liquid sounded low, i assume that was probably part of the problem. its been sounding funky for days. sounding like a bad pully, but all the rest are free spinning and dont make that god awful sound.
I know this is an older post, so this won't help the OP, but maybe it will help someone else. You CAN bypass the AC compressor on the 3.5 and 3.9 and still spin the water pump backwards; in fact I am doing it right now. You need to also skip the rear idler pulley and use a 70.5 inch serpentine. Everything works perfectly (with no AC of course).
 

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There's more than one way to skin a cat!
There's more than one way to do a whole bunch of things.
But, ... there isn't more than one way to spin, ... a ... water pump.
There are rotational arrows cast on them as a prompt to prevent being hooked-up spinning wrongly.
Backwards.
If the only way to snake the Belt on means you have to spin the water pump backwards.
You need, ... a water pump -- designed to spin backwards.
Same pump.
Totally different impeller.
 

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There's more than one way to skin a cat!
There's more than one way to do a whole bunch of things.
But, ... there isn't more than one way to spin, ... a ... water pump.
There are rotational arrows cast on them as a prompt to prevent being hooked-up spinning wrongly.
Backwards.
If the only way to snake the Belt on means you have to spin the water pump backwards.
You need, ... a water pump -- designed to spin backwards.
Same pump.
Totally different impeller.
Sorry, I should clarify...by backwards, I just meant in the opposite direction of the other accessories. The pump is spinning in the correct direction for the factory impeller setup.
 
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