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Discussion Starter #1
I get a bearing noise from the end, almost like its the front bearing constantly growling, but not too loud. When I go slightly to the left on the highway around 50-60 mph, I will get a slight metallic/grinding sound. Going back to the right stops it. I can tell the rear is making noise but not sure on which side. Won't really be able to jack it up and check it for a week or two but have ordered one bearing to throw into whatever side it is. Any ideas? I cannot remember how the right/left noise goes towards parts to repair.
 

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If your turning left and the noise gets louder then it's the right brg
As you turn left you load the right side of the vehicle.
That's my bet
 

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Do you have access to a lift or are you able to raise the vehicle? If you are pick up a cheap automotive stethoscope for $7 ( http://amzn.to/2AeJrdF ) And rotate the wheel and listen to the bearing. You can also do this with a long screw driver. Just put your ear to the handle and the other end on the bearing.
 

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Just did both of mine, since it was my right rear that was making a racket. Honestly an impact wrench was a huge time saver. I also did the brakes since I was going to have to take it all off.
 

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^ kd7ctv, what year is your Impala? Do you happen to remember the size of the big nuts on the rears? Probably can't tell on the rears by turning noise (bearing load) since they are simply trailing wheels. Best to heed carnau's advice above: rotate/spin and listen with a mechanics stethoscope and/or grab the coil spring feeling/listening for noise. Fwiw, you can source a mechanics stethoscope at Harbor Freight Tools for ~$5.
 

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^ kd7ctv, what year is your Impala? Do you happen to remember the size of the big nuts on the rears? Probably can't tell on the rears by turning noise (bearing load) since they are simply trailing wheels. Best to heed carnau's advice above: rotate/spin and listen with a mechanics stethoscope and/or grab the coil spring feeling/listening for noise. Fwiw, you can source a mechanics stethoscope at Harbor Freight Tools for ~$5.
They are 18mm bolts.
 

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^ kd7ctv, what year is your Impala? Do you happen to remember the size of the big nuts on the rears? Probably can't tell on the rears by turning noise (bearing load) since they are simply trailing wheels. Best to heed carnau's advice above: rotate/spin and listen with a mechanics stethoscope and/or grab the coil spring feeling/listening for noise. Fwiw, you can source a mechanics stethoscope at Harbor Freight Tools for ~$5.
Mine is a 2008. And I could hear mine plain as day, it would get much louder when I took sweeping turns while driving. Of course when I jacked it up, I had plenty of play that shouldn't have been there. Watching the 1A auto video on it was a good start, but I also have a friend who used to turn wrenches so I picked his brain. The big bolts were 18's as Carnau said. I used my impact to break them loose then a regular socket to finish it. The biggest pain in the butt was banging the bearing assembly out of the mount on the car. But I found that if I turned the rotor backwards and bolted it back on, it was much easier to knock the bearing off. But I was also doing the brakes so I used the old rotor to do it. I'm not sure I would have done that if I wasn't replacing everything.
 

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Mine is a 2008. And I could hear mine plain as day, it would get much louder when I took sweeping turns while driving. Of course when I jacked it up, I had plenty of play that shouldn't have been there. Watching the 1A auto video on it was a good start, but I also have a friend who used to turn wrenches so I picked his brain. The big bolts were 18's as Carnau said. I used my impact to break them loose then a regular socket to finish it. The biggest pain in the butt was banging the bearing assembly out of the mount on the car. But I found that if I turned the rotor backwards and bolted it back on, it was much easier to knock the bearing off. But I was also doing the brakes so I used the old rotor to do it. I'm not sure I would have done that if I wasn't replacing everything.
I use a slap hammer with a bearing grip and it works great. Something to look into if you work on bearings a lot.
 

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I use a slap hammer with a bearing grip and it works great. Something to look into if you work on bearings a lot.
Nope. Heck I didn't even want to do these. I've had the bearings for a year before I had to decide to sell the car or keep it for our upcoming PCS. I figured with throwing the bearings in for the next person I wasn't going to get much out of the car. Doing the bearings I wasn't going to get much for the car since I can find plenty for $2500 or so on CL. So I decided to hold on it it. It's a good car, paid off, and is actually pretty reliable. Then it came down to do it now, or wait until we get to our new duty station. Figured if I was going to tow it or drive it they needed to be done before Feb. So I ordered all brake stuff and knocked it out. Of course what I thought was an easy couple hour job, turned into an all day affair for both. After all whoever serviced the car last time must not have had a torque wrench and used an impact on everything. But the brakes looked like they needed changing so it's a good thing I decided to do it all.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Awesome thanks guys. I figured it was the right rear, had one go out on a Grand prix and I thought it was the opposite on when the noise is made. Got impact, compressor ect and have done rear bearings on a G6 and couple other GM mid-sized so should be really straight forward. Rotors look like their shot so I went ahead and ordered the rear brakes to throw on as well. In and out under 100$.

The puller is also a great addition to anyone who does work. I have only used it for cv half-shafts but they can easily be put onto the lugs and pull a bearing out, but my 2LB hammer usually does the job for knocking a bearing from the knuckles. Some of the best money I have spent on a couple pickle forks and the axle puller.
 

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I use a slap hammer with a bearing grip and it works great. Something to look into if you work on bearings a lot.
Absolutely. This tool is essential if you are trying to pull bearings, particularly any bearings that have spent years in cold weather. Buy one of these and do it the right way rather than trying to bang the crap out of it with a hammer and risk damaging other parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow, that one was a real pain. I do not believe it has been replaced in the 11 years and 180K miles. MN really does a number with rust. Managed to heat it up a little and used my axle puller/slider to finally break it loose after a couple hours got it out and new one in. Doing the brakes at the same time, so I will have to check the other side as well.

Oh, the noise came from the FRONT driver bearing. It was totally in pieces when I removed it and installed the two extra front wheel bearings that were never installed onto my old 04 Impala. Noise went away, but the rear was still humming pretty loudly. Without the axle puller I do not think I could of gotten it out of there.
 
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