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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It's that time again. I am looking for advice from those in the know.

Oil change in the bag.

Trans fluid change is next. The trans is running fine with no noticeable slippage, hard shifts, or noises. I think I will add Lucas Trans Conditioner rather than Lucas Trans Fix. Could use some feedback to see if that is the correct tact.

Also on the checklist is a spark plug change. I want to get my learned colleagues' opinions on OEM vs. Upgraded Coil changeout at that time or is this needed at this time. If so, is there a particular coil that's preferred by the group. Thanks in advance for any feedback.

2013 LT with 3.6 Flex
 

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It's that time again. I am looking for advice from those in the know.

Oil change in the bag.

Trans fluid change is next. The trans is running fine with no noticeable slippage, hard shifts, or noises. I think I will add Lucas Trans Conditioner rather than Lucas Trans Fix. Could use some feedback to see if that is the correct tact.

Also on the checklist is a spark plug change. I want to get my learned colleagues' opinions on OEM vs. Upgraded Coil changeout at that time or is this needed at this time. If so, is there a particular coil that's preferred by the group. Thanks in advance for any feedback.
Year, make, model and engine would be very helpful.

GM does NOT recommend any additives to the transmission, other than the correct Dexron fluid.

The ignition coil(s) do not need to be changed, unless they are defective. If your engine has ignition wires, they should be changed with the spark plugs (as you will probably damage one or more of them when they are removed).

Inspect and clean the inside of the throttle body bore with throttle body spray cleaner, not carburetor cleaner.

Check and replace the engine air filter if necessary. Check and replace the HVAC air filter if necessary.

Inspect and clean (if needed) the battery terminal connectors. Clean the battery post connectors (if top-post), and the top of the battery.

Check and adjust the tire pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I edited the original post to include the year and engine. My apologies for the oversight.

Good copy regarding the additives. I replaced all the filters mentioned last October. I replaced the battery and alternator last July and recently confirmed good connections during regular PMCS. Tires are checked once a week to 35psi. Wilco on the TBI Cleaner and will read up on MAF Sensor as well.

My OBD reader is not detecting any misfires. Can I assume the coils are good to go?
 

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I edited the original post to include the year and engine. My apologies for the oversight.

Good copy regarding the additives. I replaced all the filters mentioned last October. I replaced the battery and alternator last July and recently confirmed good connections during regular PMCS. Tires are checked once a week to 35psi. Wilco on the TBI Cleaner and will read up on MAF Sensor as well.

My OBD reader is not detecting any misfires. Can I assume the coils are good to go?

I would suggest that the coils are fine and do not need to be replaced.

I used to own a 2012 Impala LTZ with the 3.6, now own a 2014 Impala 2LTZ (new model) with the same engine. They are very reliable and smooth - just keep the oil and filter changed, on a good schedule with quality parts.

When I service my car - I also check the air in the spare tire (often neglected by some), all the exterior lights, and lubricate the various metal contact points (hood latch, door strikers, door hinges, trunk hinge assemblies, In the Fall (I live in the Midwest with cold winters) - I lubricate all the weathstrips with silicone dielectric grease, including the sunroof gaskets.

The 2013 Impala should have a secondary HVAC filter inside the cowl, separate from the panel type filter above the blower cage/motor (passenger side of cowl, under the black plastic air inlet grille). The filter is held on with one push-pin style clip. Remove the clip, and the filter can be washed in warm soapy water, and allowed to dry in the sun or inside for a few hours. Replacements are somewhat pricy and I’ve found they can be cleaned easily.
 

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Thanks for the info on the secondary HVAC filter. I will have to look for it. I had no idea there were 2.
The secondary filter is made of a fibrous material (not a paper-panel type). It is a little larger than a pack of cigarettes and is irregularity shaped (about 1/4 inch thick). The single black push-pin connector that holds it has a center pull-out pin (like the pins that hold the black plastic air inlet grilles). The filter is mounted at the edge of the cowl drain trough - near the fender.
 
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