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I just purchased a CPO 2018 Impala Premier and the % oil life remaining was at 100% when I left the dealer, but it’s already fallen to 89% after less than 450 miles, which would translate to having my next service done at approximately 4500 miles. I live in San Diego by the coast, so the temp is always mild (60-75) and most of my driving is easy city or freeway (no mountains), and I don’t drive aggressively. Is this typical? I was expecting to be able to go around 7500 miles in between scheduled servicing since my driving is pretty average. Any insight?
 

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I just purchased a CPO 2018 Impala Premier and the % oil life remaining was at 100% when I left the dealer, but it’s already fallen to 89% after less than 450 miles, which would translate to having my next service done at approximately 4500 miles. I live in San Diego by the coast, so the temp is always mild (60-75) and most of my driving is easy city or freeway (no mountains), and I don’t drive aggressively. Is this typical? I was expecting to be able to go around 7500 miles in between scheduled servicing since my driving is pretty average. Any insight?
I got about the same numbers you did, a little over 4000 miles till your next oil change. I agree that seems low.

But keep driving it and see how it goes. Perhaps the descent rate of the %-oil life left will slow down some and give you more life than it currently appears.

What's the oil level look like? Is it staying in the good zone on the dip stick?

Doug

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Thanks! That’s helpful to know it might not be unusual. The oil level was normal when I last checked.
 

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on the several forums i'm on everyone says don't believe the oil life monitor system. go by mileage. if you use a good reputable synthetic oil then 5k miles should be reasonable (pair it with a good reputable filter depending on the application). a lot of things go into how far the oil can last, driving conditions such as stop and go traffic affect it, cold or hot temps affect it etc. what does your manual say for the mileage? or are they saying go by the OLM these days?
 

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We were told when we bought our 2012 new to go by the olm and to change the oil around 30 percent life remaining. That usually has our car between 5 and 6 thousand miles.

I don't know about your situation with your car being preowned, as to how the car was driven before you got it, if it did a lot of sitting or idling. Best as I am aware the olm does not go by mileage, is it possible the computer is estimating the oil life based on old driving habits?

Would probably just go along with the next change based on the olm, and see if it changes as the car adapts to your driving habits.
 

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OLM are essentially crank revolution counters. Cold starts with accompanying high idle, stop and go etc. all make for more crank revolutions, life remaining going down faster.

So they do not measure anything about the oil, just the use it has seen.
 

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OLM are essentially crank revolution counters. Cold starts with accompanying high idle, stop and go etc. all make for more crank revolutions, life remaining going down faster.

So they do not measure anything about the oil, just the use it has seen.
^This, there are no sensors that read the actual condition or quality of the oil. The car can't sense whether you put regular or synthetic in there, or what type of filter you're running. The computer gathers data from how you're running the car, and predicts the oil life based on that. As stated before, make sure the oil filter you use is rated for more than 3000 miles as well.. because if it's not, you'll just be feeding your motor sludge filled oil. That's no bueno.
 

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On my vacation last month, I drove 500 miles in a day on all freeways or state highways at 60-75 miles an hour. The oil percent only went down 2-3%. This would translate to 15,000 miles between oil changes, per the oil life computer.
City and even short distance freeway driving really knocks down the remaining oil life quickly compared to long trips.
 

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^This, there are no sensors that read the actual condition or quality of the oil. The car can't sense whether you put regular or synthetic in there, or what type of filter you're running. The computer gathers data from how you're running the car, and predicts the oil life based on that. As stated before, make sure the oil filter you use is rated for more than 3000 miles as well.. because if it's not, you'll just be feeding your motor sludge filled oil. That's no bueno.
The 3000mile idea is DECADES outdated, that was 1970-80s stuff where carburetors were dumping raw fuel into the oil. Yes modern DGI has gotten harder on oil than things were with standard sequential port injection but not 3000k miles hard unless there are other factors like extreme short trips or dirty environment.

I saw a few guys test the OLM on the 90s cars that would go up to I think 7500miles for the OLM light, what folks found was that when the computer said it was time to change the oil was indeed spent but not to the point of doing harm to the engine yet. Yes modern DGI is harder on oil but not 3K mile interval hard 5-6K is going to be good for most.

Like 12 lt said change at 20-30% remaining and all will be good and you are treating the car well, more than bare minimum.

On filters the Delco appear pretty cheaply made but they are good for the OLM intervals which can easily be 6K+.

Fram basic filters are cheaply built but likely the highest selling and we rarely hear of actual failures though I wont even buy one for my lawn mower.

If changing my own oil I tend to walk into Advance or AutoZone and buy whatever premium oil/filter package they have on sale for $30ish.
 

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^This, there are no sensors that read the actual condition or quality of the oil. The car can't sense whether you put regular or synthetic in there, or what type of filter you're running. The computer gathers data from how you're running the car, and predicts the oil life based on that. As stated before, make sure the oil filter you use is rated for more than 3000 miles as well.. because if it's not, you'll just be feeding your motor sludge filled oil. That's no bueno.
The 3000mile idea is DECADES outdated, that was 1970-80s stuff where carburetors were dumping raw fuel into the oil. Yes modern DGI has gotten harder on oil than things were with standard sequential port injection but not 3000k miles hard unless there are other factors like extreme short trips or dirty environment.

I saw a few guys test the OLM on the 90s cars that would go up to I think 7500miles for the OLM light, what folks found was that when the computer said it was time to change the oil was indeed spent but not to the point of doing harm to the engine yet. Yes modern DGI is harder on oil but not 3K mile interval hard 5-6K is going to be good for most.

Like 12 lt said change at 20-30% remaining and all will be good and you are treating the car well, more than bare minimum.

On filters the Delco appear pretty cheaply made but they are good for the OLM intervals which can easily be 6K+.

Fram basic filters are cheaply built but likely the highest selling and we rarely hear of actual failures though I wont even buy one for my lawn mower.

If changing my own oil I tend to walk into Advance or AutoZone and buy whatever premium oil/filter package they have on sale for $30ish.
I never said that he should change his oil every 3000 miles. I simply stated he should buy a filter that is rated to last longer than that.

The filter makes a huge difference on how clean these motors stay when you're going 6000+ miles between oil changes. When it's done repeatedly the life of the motor absolutely decreases. I've pulled apart modern engines that have had 50,000 miles on them that look filthy and have pulled engines that are clean as a whistle with the same mileage. The cheap filters are still only good for about 3,000 miles before they're junk and are feeding your engine the same crud it's spitting out. Yes, engine failures within the warranty period because of this are rare, but why chance it? Also why not try to keep the motor going for 300,000+ miles?

PS- +1 on the fram filters. They're literally made out of cardboard on the inside and are complete junk. I won't use anything other than nappa
 
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