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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hows it going everyone have a 68 4 door impala and recently rebuilt the front suspension minus some bushings. I aligned it and cannot get a proper camber alignment. I put new control arm bushings in 2 years ago. when i was on the rack it seemed if i pushed the front end of the car down it would be in the green on a hunter aligner! so i'm guessing the new springs and shocks are doing this to the car?!?
It does still have a slight lean to the right but i think thats because i did not have time to change rear control arm bushings and they are falling apart.

I can still drive it cuz there both the same positive camber on each wheel. My instructor said i needed something called an offset control arm. i was wondering if i could just get the shaft or do i need the whole arm? and what would be a good produce to use. And most importantly what does an offset control arm do?

thanks for answering the questions!
 

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8th Gen Antagonist
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I don't know what an offset control arm is, but you can get thinner control arm shafts to allow for more adjustment. Look on rockauto, moog makes them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thank you do you think that would be enough for (if i remember right) 1.7 degrees positive camber

i already have about 6 shims in the control arm just to get the caster right.
 

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8th Gen Antagonist
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Not sure how much extra adjustment they provide, but I would think so. I actually have a set I purchased for my car, but I haven't put them on yet, waiting on balljoints and bushings... If you look at them, they are flat instead of round, maybe as much as 1/4" thinner.
 

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ok so,,

An offset control arm is generally a shaft forged with the bushing area forged off set from shaft center line, some cheaper ones use heavy material and shave one side.
Either way it allows the upper arm too drop inward to correct the camber.
As long as there is thread showing out side of nuts you can keep adding shims. Try to leave atleast one thread outside of nuts as most are crimp nuts.
NOW if you actually need more space you MIGHT be able to find slightly thinner grade 8 crimp type lock nuts, usually gives another 1/16 shim or so.
As for caster go for as high a positive as you can and still get better camber, and actually dropping the camber closer too negative side of specs. Add some better geometry maybe tall ball joints if needed.
Experimenting with no springs or shocks and run through whole range of movement too see if it goes positive or negative as you raise the wheel.
Then you can work out if tall ball joints revise camber gain, or correctly negative camber gain. AS you want wheels falling inward as tire rses in wheel wheel under compression.
You could also possibly upgrade to SPC type arms. Look up SC&C and ask for Marcus, he can whip you up a set, probably has everything ready to go.
And as for my credentials, I am an ASE Master Automotive Technician with nearly 30yrs of experience.
 
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