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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sooooo... I needed a new remote key fob for my 2012 Impala LTZ. I already knew where to get a replacement from besides paying the astronomical prices for one from a GM stealership, BUT I wondered if there were any other options. I did a Google Search on the 'FCC' and 'IC' numbers on the back of my OEM key fob and learned that Cadillac and other GM vehicles used the same frequencies but different key fob styles.

One of my Google Searches lead me to a vendor on eBay that sold remotes with the frequencies I needed at a price of only $30, so I bought one. I had it programmed today at a local locksmith for only $40, which is half the price of what a stealership will charge. Everything works! The range on it isn't as far as the OEM remote, though, but that isn't a big deal since I use the OnStar app on my phone anyway for long distance remote car starting for when the weather is cold or really hot.

Anyhoooo... here's my new remote. I also had a new GM key cut today as well for only $2... I purchased the blank off of eBay for $15 over a year ago.

 

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Looks good! Can you point me in the direction of where to find one? My brother decided to lose my spare keyfob a few months ago, been avoiding replacing it...
 

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I also had a new GM key cut today as well for only $2... I purchased the blank off of eBay for $15 over a year ago.

Not that $2 is a lot, but Wal-Mart will cut your key for free if you bring in the blank. Either that or the guy I had just didn't feel like ringing me up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
According to the owners manual, it looks like we can program extra keys, but not the remotes...

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This is correct. Programming a new key is simple... takes less than 2 minutes. I really don't understand the point of these newer chipped keys since the programming is so simple. It's not like you have to enter any type of security code to get the car's ECM in programming mode or anything for it to sync with the new key.
 

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JT, like Ford, do you need 2 original keys to start with in order to program more?
It looks like you just need the original key and the new key.

I really don't understand the point of these newer chipped keys since the programming is so simple. It's not like you have to enter any type of security code to get the car's ECM in programming mode or anything for it to sync with the new key.
Well, you do need the original key to program a new one, so it is still "secure"...

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It looks like you just need the original key and the new key.



Well, you do need the original key to program a new one, so it is still "secure"...

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If you have a mated key for the vehicle you stole there's no reason to make another...

Making it more difficult for the owner to make another key only benefits the people that can make said key.
 

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If you have a mated key for the vehicle you stole there's no reason to make another...

Making it more difficult for the owner to make another key only benefits the people that can make said key.
I'm not following your logic here - would you rather that anyone can just easily make a key for your car (without having the original)?? It's not difficult at all for the owner to make a duplicate key - it takes all of 10 seconds and you can do it yourself.

This chipped keys also stop people from using "shaved" keys and things like that to steal your car.

I don't know, makes sense to me... ?

Now needing to go to a dealership to get keyfobs programmed (even if you have the original), now that I agree is a PIA! :)

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I'm not following your logic here - would you rather that anyone can just easily make a key for your car (without having the original)?? It's not difficult at all for the owner to make a duplicate key - it takes all of 10 seconds and you can do it yourself.

This chipped keys also stop people from using "shaved" keys and things like that to steal your car.

I don't know, makes sense to me... ?

Now needing to go to a dealership to get keyfobs programmed (even if you have the original), now that I agree is a PIA! :)

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A bump key will not have the chip mated to the controllers and you shouldn't be able to mate a single unmated key to the controller without a Tech 2 or 30 minute re-learn. If you know the 30 minute re-learn you realize it can't be easily done with a bump key.

If you already have one of the mated and cut keys you can already steal the car. Why bother with making another? Cars are stolen to be chopped up for parts. Honestly some of the more well organized thieves just back up with a tow truck and tow the victim to the chop shop.

There's no reason to make it more difficult for the owner to make a new key or FOB using his already mated spare key or FOB. If you've lost all of the already mated parts then you shouldn't be allowed by the controller to make a fresh set without factory scan tool intervention... It would be nice if the spare key or spare FOB learn procedure unlinked any keys or FOBS, whichever you're linking, that are not present to be programmed. Unfortunately the lost key or FOB is still in the active list of up to ten keys if you don't use a Tech 2 or equally capable scan tool.

Mating a Key without at least one mated key should probably require a connection to the authorized dealership net so that your handy dandy local thieves guild with a Chinese Tech 2 can't do it without exposing their forged GM technician credentials, ISP IP location information, the Tech 2 Ident, and the VIN of the stolen vehicle... making it easier to prosecute them once caught.

VW and many other MFG lock their customers out of making a new spare even when they have one mated key. That's profit driven. Coding the security controls such that it's secure without locking out the owner probably takes more effort and the dealerships loose an extremely profitable easy job.
 

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Your new fob looks great. I might have to order a new key fob because one of mine has a crack and doesn't open and close too well.
 

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Thank you!

OP, thanks for the head's up on the fob. :eek:k3:

I bought two of them and a Dorman fob programmer off the Bay. Programming took less than a minute, and both new fobs work perfectly.

Cheers!
 
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Tell me more about the fob "programmer".
Two different Dorman key fob programmer kits are available for our cars. The programming unit is a little black box that just plugs into the OBDII port under the dash near the parking brake. After you plug in the programming unit, insert your key in the ignition and twist it to the ON (not START) position, your dash info display will indicate that the ECM is in remote fob learning mode. Then, you just press and hold both the LOCK and UNLOCK buttons on the new fob until the door locks cycle, and you're done.

Each programmer kit is blister packed with a new OEM-looking fob.

The programming unit in the Dorman 99155 kit works with my 2016 and programmed a couple of the "OUC6000066 5b" fobs shown in this thread just fine. The kit runs 40-something on eBay. The fob included with this kit wouldn't pair with my car, so this may be the wrong fob. But IIRC, the maximum number of fobs that can be paired to the vehicle is five, and the two OUC6000066 5b fobs that I programmed first may have maxed mine out before I tried the one that came with the kit.

The Dorman 99157 programmer kit is listed on the Dorman website for the 2016 Impala Limited, so it will come with a fob that definitely should pair with my car. Presumably, it will also program the fob shown in this thread. If you own a 2016 and want a new OEM-style fob, this is probably the kit to buy, but it runs about $10 - $15 more on eBay than the 99155.

I suspect that the programming units in both kits are identical, and only the fobs are different, but I can't say for sure. I bought the 99155 kit to save a few bucks, since I already had 2 working OEM remotes and just wanted the more elegant looking key fob.

Cheers!
 

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:eek: You've turned up the wrong part. All you want it s the key fob programmer.

This ...

Key Fob Dorman 99155 | eBay

or this ...

Key Fob Dorman 99157 | eBay

EDIT:

As for the OUC6000066 5b fob, I assure you that it most certainly does work with my 2016 LTZ. I bought two of them, programmed them with a Dorman 99155, and both work perfectly - all functions, including remote start.

Cheers!
 

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:eek: You've turned up the wrong part. All you want it s the key fob programmer.

This ...

Key Fob Dorman 99155 | eBay

or this ...

Key Fob Dorman 99157 | eBay

EDIT:

As for the OUC6000066 5b fob, I assure you that it most certainly does work with my 2016 LTZ. I bought two of them, programmed them with a Dorman 99155, and both work perfectly - all functions, including remote start.

Cheers!

OK, I've gone to the Dorman site and neither of these come up as compatible for a 2016 Impala Limited, at least by their own filter.

I'm not arguing that they aren't applicable to a 2016, i'm just making clear that THEY do not list 2016 as compatible with these parts.

The 99155 is a 4 button remote with no button for remote start; the 99157 is a 5 button remote and includes remote start. I caught this only after going to look at the pics and description on Amazon, although the correct pics were on the Dorman site.

The 99157 is listed for '14-'15 Impala Limiteds, so I'm guessing this is yet another place that does not understand they were made in '16 as well. I've seen this in a whole bunch of sites.

Thanks for your help. :)
 
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