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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried searching here and couldn't get any hits.

I've used these for many different vehicles in the past, but they were the old style sheetmetal pans, with the 1/2-20 pitch threads, and the slip on brown gasketed washer.

Searching now for the M12x1.75 magnetic thread drainplug, I can find what appears to be a glued on generic one that a variety of sources, for varying prices, all seem to have the same one with dismal quality reviews.

The 2 others I could find seem to be a neodymium magnet of apparent good quality, one sold from a few sources, for all the same price, about $12.99 shipped.

The other is a ridiculously priced $30+ one from Dimple, available elsewhere for slightly reduced costs, but still in the high $20's.

I sprang for the almost reasonable priced neo one, and will try to install it at the next oil change. It does have a 13MM hex head rather than the standard 15MM head, just saying.

Anybody got any experience with magnetic drainplugs for modern aluminum oilpans?
 

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i would think that aluminum would be better as you really wouldn't want to make the pan magnetic. Personally i think its snake oil solution tho. The magnet just isn't strong enough to help based on the short period of time you run engine oil, which is why you see them in transmissions and rear axels from factory, but not engine oil plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i would think that aluminum would be better as you really wouldn't want to make the pan magnetic. Personally i think its snake oil solution tho. The magnet just isn't strong enough to help based on the short period of time you run engine oil, which is why you see them in transmissions and rear axels from factory, but not engine oil plugs.
Thanks for your opinion.

I fail to see how an aluminum oil pan becomes magnetic, however.

Also, oil is returned to the pan from the circulation system, then filtered for reuse, so the oil is always in the pan until drawn up by the oil pump.

I always used the GM magnetic drain plugs and there was always ferrous material clinging from the magnetic tip. Those were standard weak magnets, and the one I just bought is a neodymium rare earth magnet, which are several times stronger.

The Dimple brand claims you can hang a 1 1/2" wrench from theirs, and they have a picture of that on their site. I was not impressed enough to spend 30+ dollars on their drain plug, however.

I am surprised I have not received a reply form someone with actual experience in this yet.
 

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I tried searching here and couldn't get any hits.

I've used these for many different vehicles in the past, but they were the old style sheetmetal pans, with the 1/2-20 pitch threads, and the slip on brown gasketed washer.

Searching now for the M12x1.75 magnetic thread drainplug, I can find what appears to be a glued on generic one that a variety of sources, for varying prices, all seem to have the same one with dismal quality reviews.

The 2 others I could find seem to be a neodymium magnet of apparent good quality, one sold from a few sources, for all the same price, about $12.99 shipped.

The other is a ridiculously priced $30+ one from Dimple, available elsewhere for slightly reduced costs, but still in the high $20's.

I sprang for the almost reasonable priced neo one, and will try to install it at the next oil change. It does have a 13MM hex head rather than the standard 15MM head, just saying.

Anybody got any experience with magnetic drainplugs for modern aluminum oilpans?
I bought one for my 1999 Corvette from the dealer. (In later years, the magnetic drain plug became standard on the C5 Corvette).

You may want to check with a GM dealer part's department with you VIN and see if GM has a magnetic drain plug that is applicable to your car. This would ensure you receive the correct part.
 

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yea im saying it won't be magnetic, which is good as you want particles to be attracted to the plug and not the pan is what i was saying.Also majority of the oil isn't in the pan while the vehicle is running, which is when you metal shaving are most likely to occur and do damage. by the time they get into pan they have already been circulating through the motor in which case they should have been caught by the filter.
 
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