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Does anyone have a complete list of all zerk fittings for this generation impala? What is everyone's favorite grease? I was told Lucas red n tacky is a good choice. Thanks in advance!

2006 3500 V6
 

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Unless there have been replacement suspension parts installed, (lower ball joints, outer tie rod ends or rear stabilizer bar end links for example) all OEM joints are of the peminatly sealed and non-greasable type. Personally as for grease, if you do have greasable joints, I don't have a preference as for brand as long as its synthetic and use a couple of pumps of the grease gun at every oil change.

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As Bart said, all factory joints are permanently lubricated. On my other vehicles, I've been getting good performance from both Red Line CV-2 and Mobil 1 Synthetic.
 

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Grease compatibility is an issue because of what can happen when two incompatible greases are introduced to each other. This is important to consider when refilling a reservoir that already contains grease.
Lubrication grease is a mixture of oil and soap or another thickener. The portion of the grease that determines the compatibility is the thickener.
Lithium complex is the thickener that is most compatible with other thickeners. There are only a few other thickeners that are not compatible with lithium complex.

Moly based greases are good for ball joints, U-joints, and wheel bearings.
I use Polyurea based greases in CV joints and my mower spindles.

Polyurea will clump when introduced to Lithium or Moly greases.
 

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The most important thing about wheel bearing grease is that you use high temperature grease which will not liquify at temperatures these wheel bearings see in service. Of course, these impala do not have greaseable wheel bearings, so no issue here.

I use polyurea based grease only on my bicycles (blue Parks grease).
 

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The most important thing about wheel bearing grease is that you use high temperature grease which will not liquify at temperatures these wheel bearings see in service. Of course, these impala do not have greaseable wheel bearings, so no issue here.

I use polyurea based grease only on my bicycles (blue Parks grease).

The point I was making is on-size doesn't really fit all. I have several marked grease guns in the shop along with tubs of special goo for specific jobs. If the service manual doesn't specifically say to use xyz then I use the grease I've always used for that task.

Polyurea is special stuff. Moly complex greases are good for most applications on an automobile... with the exception of CV joints.

Most people don't bother with rebuilding their own CV shafts or they just use the Polyurea grease that comes in a pre-measured packet with the joint. I've installed replacement boots on multiple half-shafts on my ATVs and other vehicles. The trick is to pay attention and stop driving so you don't burn em up when the boots take a dump. When you replace the boots a lot of the time they don't include grease so I found out what it was and bought a tub.

My Bunton and John Deere mowers call specifically for Polyurea grease in the high speed blade spindle bearings.

Even tho they have the similar ingredients the intended operation envelope of CV joint grease and the Chevron SRI-2 Spindle grease is different enough that I wouldn't mix em.
Bunton was very specific about what to put in the mower spindles to avoid burning up the bearings. It was not a Bunton branded product and it's not super expensive. The John Deere blade spindle bearings last longer with the same goo so I use it in that mower too.
 
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