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Discussion Starter #1
A few years ago I had to change the fuel pump on a '92 Roadmaster and I swear that was one of the most miserable jobs I've ever done.

After I completed the job per the shop manual's instructions I swore that the next time I would cut a hole in the floor of the car and make an access panel.

Well today the fuel pump on my wife's '92 Caprice wagon died and I was wondering if anyone else had made an access hole and done the job that way?
 

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Seems to me it would be as much trouble to tear apart the interior and then afterwards you have a place for rust to start and water to get in.

What was so bad about dropping the tank??

I will be honest I have not done a tank drop on the wagon but the sedan is really easy.
 

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yea i did my 91 thats how i got ir running when i bought it and it was simple exactly the same w/ my old 1993 2wd chevy suburban takes maybe 2 people and 1hr tops
 

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It seems like more trouble then it is worth, if the car has a third seat then the tank will be under that. The only way to cut the hole without damaging the tank or sending unit would be to drop the tank anyway. I have dropped fuel tanks before and it can be a pain but over all it is not that hard.
 

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Pulled a hitch off one of my wagons today. Really don't see why dropping the tank would be so bad.
 

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Holy

I did cut holes in a few Suburbans that were company trucks, as the pumps would go out often back then in the early 90s from letting fuel level get below 1/4 for very long.
But these were work trucks without much above the tank area.
It was nice to be able to repair a pump on the side of the road in the rain from inside the truck.

But not sure I would do it on a wagon with a nice interior
 

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I change the pump in my '91 wagon a few months ago. After 180,000 miles, the strap bolts were hit and it was late. I cut a hole in the floor right underneath the bastard seat, changed the pump. Used what they call 'panel bond' to re-seal the hole. Some urethane primer and I was done. Less than two hours and I wa back on the road. This included splicing in a quick disconnect for the pump in case it happens again. (hope not!)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I change the pump in my '91 wagon a few months ago. After 180,000 miles, the strap bolts were hit and it was late. I cut a hole in the floor right underneath the bastard seat, changed the pump. Used what they call 'panel bond' to re-seal the hole. Some urethane primer and I was done. Less than two hours and I wa back on the road. This included splicing in a quick disconnect for the pump in case it happens again. (hope not!)
I don't blame you. I'm not sure why you need a quick disconnect though - there's a stock one there already on my car.

It always happens when you have a full tank of gas, and the internal baffles make it almost impossible to siphon out the gas. If you could, where would you put 20 gallons of gas - buy 10 gas cans or use Gatorade bottles? What an insanely stupid design - why didn't they stick with a remote pump like they used before?

When my '92 Caprice fuel pump broke no way I was going to take it out the "right" way so I cut a big hole and did it like you did. Ultimately I would find a second vehicle and cut out a larger panel to make a cover - something that overhangs and inch all around. I used (not my proudest work) foil tape to put back the cutout, which was only a big "U' shape. But under the carpet , fold down seat and fold down floor no one will know and it was a zillion times faster than doing it the stock way. And if the pump failed this week I'd sure be glad I did it. No regrets on this one.

My feeling was, just because GM blew it by not making an access panel like many other cars have doesn't mean I have to go along with it.

It cut easily with a Dremel fiberglass reinforced cutoff wheel.
 

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For me it's not worth the trouble. Lines are so close you could nick them as well. Too much of a hazard being in the interior as well.
 
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