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how can you tell the difference between a real 94 impala ss and a 94 caprice clone i have heard u cant use the Vin because it doesn't all ways go by models or something like that so if u know key things to look for to tell the difference plz hit me up
 

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2 popular ways are the SPID sticker on the truck lid, and the tire sticker on the drivers door, the SPID will have the WX3 code on there, and the tire sticker will reference 17" tires , not 15".

BUT, if someone used a donor SS for parts then the trunk & door stickers could be part of the clone process.
 

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Found this on 'another' impala site. Should probably be a sticky.

“How to tell if the car is an actual 9C1 or Impala SS and not just a cloner’s wet dream”

© DeathSStar 2005
______

We’ve all seen the infamous “Caprice SS” clone from a beat-up 9C1. Some cloner takes a ratty 9C1 with half a billion miles, threw on some Impala SS rims and decals and magically the $2,000 9C1 becomes the “bargain-priced” $6,000 Caprice SS clone.

Due to the increasing amount of ridiculous things I’ve seen on eBay and in person, I decided to write a quick “How-to” guide for the un-initiated on how to spot legitimate cars and how to avoid being ripped off by a cloner. Everyone deserves a fair chance to find the late model B-body they are looking for, without having to risk the chance of buying a cloned POS.

In order to make an informed decision about the car you looking at, you really need to view the car in person. Besides being able to see any physical defects or cloner hacks, you can inspect the VIN plate and SPID label. If you are unable to view the car in person, because the seller won’t show it or won’t provide detailed pictures, then it’s probably a bogus car and not worth the hassles.

After you view the car and like what you see, the first thing that should be looked at is Service Parts Identification (SPID) label on the inside of the deck lid. It is a white sticker with black letters, including the car’s full VIN and all major factory installed options. Once verifying the SPID is intact, confirm the VIN plate on the dash matches the VIN on the SPID. This step is crucial, since there are a fair amount of cars that have a different deck lid then they left the factory with. Reasons for this include crash or hail damage. However, if a dealer or legitimate body shop repaired the car, they would have replaced the SPID on the new deck lid.

(One caveat to this is the “10 year” rule. After 10 years, most data for a particular car is purged from the GM computer system and is no longer available from GM. This includes the SPID data, production date, etc.)

If the VIN’s do not match, or the SPID is partially destroyed/removed (especially around the VIN) there should be a very good reason why. If the VIN’s don’t match, you should ask to see the original SPID if available. Personally, I’d walk away from the car at this point, since the possibility for fraud and deception is huge at this point. If the SPID is in good shape and the VIN’s match, then you need to take a look at it and find some specific numbers to see what type of B-body you have.

The entire Caprice car line has a base model number of “1BL19”. You can not tell what submodel the car is by just seeing the model number. There are three basic Regular Production Option (RPO) codes that indicate what the the car is. The choices are a regular Caprice/Caprice Classic, police package Caprice, taxi package Caprice or an Impala SS.

The RPO’s are:

9C1 – Police package
9C6 – Taxi package
WX3 – Impala SS package

If you don’t see one of the three RPO’s listed above, the car is a regular production Caprice. This is not a bad thing, since you could order most of the highly sought- after goodies on a regular car, if you got the right options like the towing package. There are plenty of civilian Caprice’s floating around, so if you can’t find a nice 9C1 or SS, you should try to find one that is nicely loaded.

The following lists below will show some of the different RPO’s for various options, and what cars they came on.


Caprice

Some of the available options (depending on package) are:

FE3 – Sport Suspension
GU5 – 3.23 rear axle ratio (1996 with L99 only)
GW9 – 2.93 rear axle ratio (1994-95 all cars, 1996 with LT1 only)
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8 (optional engine…adds many options)
L99 – 4.3L SFI V8 (standard engine)
N10 – Dual Exhaust (with LT1 only)
V08 – Heavy duty cooling package (With towing package – 1 mech./1 elec. fan)



Police/Taxi equipment package
RPO’s 9C1/9C6

Some of the available options are below…there are too many to fully list.

FE4 – Special Ride and Handling Suspension
GU4 – 3.08 rear axle ratio (with LT1 only)
GU5 – 3.23 rear axle ratio (with L99 only)
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
JL9 – 4 wheel disc brakes
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8 (optional engine…adds many options)
L99 – 4.3L SFI V8 (standard engine)
N10 – Dual Exhaust (with LT1 only)
V03 – Extra Capacity Cooling System (dual electric fans)
7B* - Various forms of the “Special” suspension
7L9 – Power steering oil cooler

There are many RPO and SEO codes in the 6xx’s and 7xx’s that are for specific police-related equipment like spotlights, lighting and wiring prep packages. These are readily available on the Internet, and vary radically from department to department. The list is way too long for this overview.



Impala SS equipment package
RPO WX3

When the Impala SS package was ordered, the following RPO’s were automatically included. It is a very comprehensive option package, as seen below:

AG1 – 6 way power driver seat
AG2 – 6 way power passenger seat
AS7 - 45/45 leather front buckets with floor console
AU0 – Remote keyless entry
BA5 – Custom exterior ornamentation (added Impala emblems/scripts)
BC9 – Hood ornament delete
BD2 – Custom exterior ornamentation delete (removed Caprice emblems/scripts)
BV8 – Painted door handles and lock cylinders
B19 – Custom interior ornamentation (added Impala emblems, etc)
FE4 – Special Ride and Handling Suspension (with DeCarbon shocks)
GU4 - 3.08 rear axle ratio
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8
JL9 – 4 wheel disc brakes
TL4 – Painted radiator grille
T43 – Rear deck lid spoiler
NK4 – Leather wrapped steering wheel
QA0 – 17” Aluminum rims
QBJ – 17” Z-rated BFG Comp T/A all-season tires
V03 – Extra Capacity Cooling System (dual electric fans)
14I – Light gray interior trim
143 – Light gray leather seats

Ever wonder what those letters behind the year of the car mean in some people's signatures mean? It's the color of the car. For the Impala SS, there where only 3 factory colors...they are:

1994: Standard Onyx Black
1995: Standard Onyx Black, Dark Cherry Metallic, Dark Gray Green Metallic
1996: Standard Onyx Black, Dark Cherry Metallic, Dark Gray Green Metallic

When abbreviated the colors are SOB, DCM and DGGM. Some people use BBB for black, since they don't know what the GM paint name is. Usually, it means something like "Big, bad & black" or similar.



Overall, this is a very short overview of options and RPO’s that you may see on the 1994-1996 B-body. I covered the basic options that you need to know in order to tell the various models apart, but by no means covered them all! The complete GM RPO list has many 100’s of option codes and is a pretty dull read overall.

Hopefully, there’s enough information here to prevent a schiester or cloner from pulling the wool over your eyes. I’ve seem some pretty convincing Caprice-to-9C1 and 9C1-to-Impala SS clones that some people would have been suckered by. Now you know the basics and what to look for when buying one of these cars. Happy hunting!
 

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Found this on 'another' impala site. Should probably be a sticky.

“How to tell if the car is an actual 9C1 or Impala SS and not just a cloner’s wet dream”

© DeathSStar 2005
__

We’ve all seen the infamous “Caprice SS” clone from a beat-up 9C1. Some cloner takes a ratty 9C1 with half a billion miles, threw on some Impala SS rims and decals and magically the $2,000 9C1 becomes the “bargain-priced” $6,000 Caprice SS clone.

Due to the increasing amount of ridiculous things I’ve seen on eBay and in person, I decided to write a quick “How-to” guide for the un-initiated on how to spot legitimate cars and how to avoid being ripped off by a cloner. Everyone deserves a fair chance to find the late model B-body they are looking for, without having to risk the chance of buying a cloned POS.

In order to make an informed decision about the car you looking at, you really need to view the car in person. Besides being able to see any physical defects or cloner hacks, you can inspect the VIN plate and SPID label. If you are unable to view the car in person, because the seller won’t show it or won’t provide detailed pictures, then it’s probably a bogus car and not worth the hassles.

After you view the car and like what you see, the first thing that should be looked at is Service Parts Identification (SPID) label on the inside of the deck lid. It is a white sticker with black letters, including the car’s full VIN and all major factory installed options. Once verifying the SPID is intact, confirm the VIN plate on the dash matches the VIN on the SPID. This step is crucial, since there are a fair amount of cars that have a different deck lid then they left the factory with. Reasons for this include crash or hail damage. However, if a dealer or legitimate body shop repaired the car, they would have replaced the SPID on the new deck lid.

(One caveat to this is the “10 year” rule. After 10 years, most data for a particular car is purged from the GM computer system and is no longer available from GM. This includes the SPID data, production date, etc.)

If the VIN’s do not match, or the SPID is partially destroyed/removed (especially around the VIN) there should be a very good reason why. If the VIN’s don’t match, you should ask to see the original SPID if available. Personally, I’d walk away from the car at this point, since the possibility for fraud and deception is huge at this point. If the SPID is in good shape and the VIN’s match, then you need to take a look at it and find some specific numbers to see what type of B-body you have.

The entire Caprice car line has a base model number of “1BL19”. You can not tell what submodel the car is by just seeing the model number. There are three basic Regular Production Option (RPO) codes that indicate what the the car is. The choices are a regular Caprice/Caprice Classic, police package Caprice, taxi package Caprice or an Impala SS.

The RPO’s are:

9C1 – Police package
9C6 – Taxi package
WX3 – Impala SS package

If you don’t see one of the three RPO’s listed above, the car is a regular production Caprice. This is not a bad thing, since you could order most of the highly sought- after goodies on a regular car, if you got the right options like the towing package. There are plenty of civilian Caprice’s floating around, so if you can’t find a nice 9C1 or SS, you should try to find one that is nicely loaded.

The following lists below will show some of the different RPO’s for various options, and what cars they came on.


Caprice

Some of the available options (depending on package) are:

FE3 – Sport Suspension
GU5 – 3.23 rear axle ratio (1996 with L99 only)
GW9 – 2.93 rear axle ratio (1994-95 all cars, 1996 with LT1 only)
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8 (optional engine…adds many options)
L99 – 4.3L SFI V8 (standard engine)
N10 – Dual Exhaust (with LT1 only)
V08 – Heavy duty cooling package (With towing package – 1 mech./1 elec. fan)



Police/Taxi equipment package
RPO’s 9C1/9C6

Some of the available options are below…there are too many to fully list.

FE4 – Special Ride and Handling Suspension
GU4 – 3.08 rear axle ratio (with LT1 only)
GU5 – 3.23 rear axle ratio (with L99 only)
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
JL9 – 4 wheel disc brakes
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8 (optional engine…adds many options)
L99 – 4.3L SFI V8 (standard engine)
N10 – Dual Exhaust (with LT1 only)
V03 – Extra Capacity Cooling System (dual electric fans)
7B* - Various forms of the “Special” suspension
7L9 – Power steering oil cooler

There are many RPO and SEO codes in the 6xx’s and 7xx’s that are for specific police-related equipment like spotlights, lighting and wiring prep packages. These are readily available on the Internet, and vary radically from department to department. The list is way too long for this overview.



Impala SS equipment package
RPO WX3

When the Impala SS package was ordered, the following RPO’s were automatically included. It is a very comprehensive option package, as seen below:

AG1 – 6 way power driver seat
AG2 – 6 way power passenger seat
AS7 - 45/45 leather front buckets with floor console
AU0 – Remote keyless entry
BA5 – Custom exterior ornamentation (added Impala emblems/scripts)
BC9 – Hood ornament delete
BD2 – Custom exterior ornamentation delete (removed Caprice emblems/scripts)
BV8 – Painted door handles and lock cylinders
B19 – Custom interior ornamentation (added Impala emblems, etc)
FE4 – Special Ride and Handling Suspension (with DeCarbon shocks)
GU4 - 3.08 rear axle ratio
G80 – Limited slip rear axle
LT1 – 5.7L SFI High Output V8
JL9 – 4 wheel disc brakes
TL4 – Painted radiator grille
T43 – Rear deck lid spoiler
NK4 – Leather wrapped steering wheel
QA0 – 17” Aluminum rims
QBJ – 17” Z-rated BFG Comp T/A all-season tires
V03 – Extra Capacity Cooling System (dual electric fans)
14I – Light gray interior trim
143 – Light gray leather seats

Ever wonder what those letters behind the year of the car mean in some people's signatures mean? It's the color of the car. For the Impala SS, there where only 3 factory colors...they are:

1994: Standard Onyx Black
1995: Standard Onyx Black, Dark Cherry Metallic, Dark Gray Green Metallic
1996: Standard Onyx Black, Dark Cherry Metallic, Dark Gray Green Metallic

When abbreviated the colors are SOB, DCM and DGGM. Some people use BBB for black, since they don't know what the GM paint name is. Usually, it means something like "Big, bad & black" or similar.



Overall, this is a very short overview of options and RPO’s that you may see on the 1994-1996 B-body. I covered the basic options that you need to know in order to tell the various models apart, but by no means covered them all! The complete GM RPO list has many 100’s of option codes and is a pretty dull read overall.

Hopefully, there’s enough information here to prevent a schiester or cloner from pulling the wool over your eyes. I’ve seem some pretty convincing Caprice-to-9C1 and 9C1-to-Impala SS clones that some people would have been suckered by. Now you know the basics and what to look for when buying one of these cars. Happy hunting!
 

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Hey so my title just says 1996 chev when I look up the vin number through nmvtis it comes up as caprice classic. Now the vin matches the dash the door panel and the trunk and the trunk does have 1bl19 but it also has wx3 in the list of a whole bunch of other codes. So is this an impala a real impala ss or is it a caprice classic impala ss? I’m confused
 

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Hey so my title just says 1996 chev when I look up the vin number through nmvtis it comes up as caprice classic. Now the vin matches the dash the door panel and the trunk and the trunk does have 1bl19 but it also has wx3 in the list of a whole bunch of other codes. So is this an impala a real impala ss or is it a caprice classic impala ss? I’m confused
 

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The Caprice and Impala were two seperate models so if it were a true Impala the vin should come up at it I would imagine?
 
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