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How's it going. I just traded a van for 77 Impala with the wrap around rear window and I would like to know more about this particular car. It's not in the best shape but still runs good and the body is super straight. Has not been wrecked. Can some one help me?
 

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First Welcome to the community. Yes I do own a 77 Chevy Impala. Mine is a 4 door sedan. I do love the coupe with the wrap around rear window. I have thought of modifying mine with that window. I would actually pay to have it done.

The 2 Door coupe was limited in production, there was not very many of them built or still around today. I am not sure how many were made. The design was carried I believe through 1979.

The 77 had either the 305 cid 5.0L or 350 cid 5.7L engines. Though a very few had the 250 cid In-line 6.

1977 was the first year of the 5th generation of the Impalas (1977-1985).

Here is a part from: http://www.goissca.org/imp_hist.htm

The 1977 downsizing of the popular full-size Impala was a risky gamble for Chevrolet. Chevrolet offered an assortment of smaller, more fuel-efficient cars, and redesigned the Impala once again in 1977 to meet changing demands. Wheelbase was cut by 5.5”, overall length cut 10.6”, they were 4” narrower and curb weight was cut by more than 700 pounds. Engines were downsized, too. The 454 big block was history. There hadn’t been such a radical difference in two consecutive model years since 1959. Production increased in '77 versus a year prior, and Impala was named Motor Trend Car of the Year. Compared to the 1977 Impalas, the Impalas of the late 1960’s and mid-1970’s might as well have been from an episode of the Flintstones. The Impala “S” model and Sport Sedans were dropped. All models had pillars. Impalas had an 8 x 3 hole eggcrate grille pattern with center Bowtie emblem, plus quad rectangular headlamps over quad park/signal lamps. The new Impalas were shorter in length, taller in stature and narrower. Impala embodied the new image of the full-size American car - smaller, lighter, more efficient. (For example, even with its trim dimensions, the new Impala featured increased headroom, legroom and trunk space.) The formula seemed to work. All-time sales passed the 12-million mark. The Impala had adapted once again. The 1977 Impala/Caprice was a style leader. It wasn’t sexy like the 1962 Impala Super Sport with a four speed and a 409, but this was the age of practicality. The big 400 and 454 ci engines were gone, but with the most powerful engine and the F-41 suspension (HD springs and shock absorbers and larger sway bars) the car handled like no other full size sedan. With 700 pounds less weight to carry from the previous Impala, the improvement in handling didn’t go unnoticed. A new diagnostic connector under the hood allowed up to 35 engine tests. The new Impala/Caprice sedans were an immediate hit. Impala put more than a quarter million cars on the road each year for three consecutive years: 1977, 1978 and 1979. These “B-body” Impalas would continue in use, with a minor 1980 facelift, through 1990 (only as a Caprice from 1986-1990). Each year the Impala received moderate face-lifts. Engines included the standard 250 ci 110 bhp I-6 as well as the optional engines: 305 ci 145 bhp V8 and the 350 ci 170 bhp V8. For 1977 prices ranged from $4,876-$5,406. Weights were approximately 3,533-4,072 lbs. A total of 320,279 were made that year.

When you have any question please feel free to ask me, I will always try to help out. Kenny.
 
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