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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 04 Chevy Impala LS and the fog lights are filled with condensation. Its easy to remove the fog light but not the lens from the housing. Any ideas on how to clean this out?
 

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Here's the issue. There's a break in the seal, so not only do you need to clean it, you need to completely reseal it. I'd suggest going to a junk yard or something and buying a new set or just the one if it will match. If you want to try the DIY fix, let me know and I can show you the steps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your input, to be honest i just really started working myself on my car so the DIY would be ideal. I might roll by the junk yard and look for some fog lights. I was also thinking about buying some HID bulbs for them. My car looks alot like yours. White 04 LS with everything but On-Star.
 

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Wouldnt be too hard to work that. You have two options:

1) Heat up some water so that its almost to a boil. Dip the face of the lens in the water so that the sealant around the edges gets warm and pliable. Alternate between heating and prying until your get the lens to separate from the housing.

2) pop that bad boy into the oven. Start with low temps around 175 and work your way up until your find a temp that melts the sealant, but not the light. Pull the light out every 10-15 mins to try to pry the lens off the housing.

Once you do that, have at it with some windex. Be very careful not to leave streaks, as they certainly will show. Once theyre cleaned, lay down a bead of RTV Silicone ($11 at parts store, they have multiple colors) and carefully lay the lens back down. Make sure you form a good seal, as this will prevent more moisture coming in. The sealant takes 24 hours to set.

Any questions let me know. ive done this on 5 different headlights before with decent results.
 

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I wouldn't use Windex, it has ammonia in it that will eat and mar the plastic.

Use an ammonia free Windex solution.

The following products do not contain ammonia. They can be used in cases where ammonia is not recommended for use on surface.
Windex® Crystal Rain™, Windex® Multi-Surface with Glade® Clear Springs™, Windex® Multi-Surface Antibacterial, Windex® Multi-Surface Vinegar, Windex® Outdoor Multi-Surface Concentrated Cleaner and Windex™ Outdoor All-in-One Glass Cleaning Tool
Edit: Well reading up on their site, apparently Windex is safe to use on plastics? I would still use an ammonia free one. Learn something new everyday. :p
 

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Ammonia is generally bad on anything with multiple layers, mirrors for example. The ammonia penetrates and can cause the layers to separate. Just don't use anything solvent based.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the input guys, ill be giving this a try when i have a chance and let you know the out come. Has anyone else had this problem? the car has about 160,000 miles on it. So im assuming its normal for the seals to start to go bad.
 

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I cant imagine using windex to clean your fog lights or headlights will cause any problems...been using it for 9 years and never have I seen any adverse side effects. Chances are, youll send your car to the scrap heap before you start to see any adverse effects of using windex.

I also use windex to clean chrome wheels. Id beleive you if you told me THAT would cause problems.
 

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Is there anything you can't use to clean chrome wheels? Mine are bare freaking aluminum.
 

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Drill a small hole at the lowest point when the light is mounted (around 1/16"). This may take care of the problem until you get a new lens. It lets water drain out and lets air in to dry the condension.
 
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