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On our 4th Impala but the "19, like its recent predecessors, has a great sound system BUT no option to play CD's. Anyone have a recommendation for a good after-market device I could buy to plug into the available ports? XM-Sirius is great but there are times I want MY music! Tks!
 

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My 2016 still has a CD player, but to be honest I never use it anymore. I burned my entire CD collection onto a 32 Gig USB drive, plugged it into the car, and now I have my entire library at my fingertips at any given moment.
 

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On our 4th Impala but the "19, like its recent predecessors, has a great sound system BUT no option to play CD's. Anyone have a recommendation for a good after-market device I could buy to plug into the available ports? XM-Sirius is great but there are times I want MY music! Tks!
I poked around some on the web yesterday with no great results.

I see battery powered, portable CD players. Besides needing to maintain the batteries, you will need to connect its speaker out to the radio's aux-in, if that's possible. And aux-in may need a low input voltage level that's hard to achieve with the speaker output - you may need to add some scaling resistors to drop the voltage.

Ideally, it would be nice to find a unit that plays and powers itself via the USB port into the radio.

I would go to a couple stereo shops and see what they offer, just to get a feel for what is actually available.

During my searches yesterday (eg, "portable cd player with usb connection for car") I kept getting bum steers to units lacking half the features. So some hands-on at Car Toys or Best Buy would be my next step.

HTH.

[Edit]FWIW, the last head unit I bought, for my boat, was AM-FM-USB - no CD player. Like Keller indicated in his post, I use a memory stick that has ~40 CD's burned onto it (with lots of room left for more), and leave the CD's at the house.


Doug

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if you had a smart device such as a phone or tablet you could probably use pandora or spotify for free (i use the paid service of spotify with the family plan and get unlimited streaming with no commercials). CDs/DVDs are a dying breed much like the beta max/vhs players of yesteryear. GM isn't putting them into the cars due to the high infiltration of bluetooth connectivity devices in society i would imagine. if you had a cd you absolutely love but can't find on a streaming service you could always rip the cd to your pc and load the songs onto a phone/mp3 player as stated above (even an SD card possibly if the car has the slot for one). as much as i dislike the company an apple ipod/iphone would probably be the easiest for someone that isn't adept with electronics as the interface is pretty smartly laid out and easy to use.

i know this doesn't answer your question but otherwise you're looking at a portable cd player using an aux port with 3.5 mm cable or the fm modulator with the aux port to transfer the songs to an fm channel (walmart has the fm modulators for like 20 bucks as of a year ago i saw). this style of method would probably degrade the sound quality greatly i would think.

or go have an aftermarket radio installed that still has a cd player installed (may be the easiest if you don't want to go down the smart device route).

just my 2 cents.
 

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The mp3 route in a car works fine for most people (including myself) who don't care or notice if music has any dynamism or range while driving down the road. If you are an audiophile, then there is a noticeable difference in sound quality when comparing a CD, or even an old school phonograph, level of quality to a digital mp3.
There are ways to copy music at CD quality, but it takes up a lot of space, so a 32GB USB drive would only hold like 150-250 songs.
For myself, I use my home computer to store all the CD quality data from over 500 CDs. And I use the MP3 input plug to play music or podcasts in my car. I like to hear music when at home or with headphones, whereas music/podcasts are just background noise when in my car, so quality is not as paramount.

I am always a bit behind on tech since I buy used. So my current car was the first with an MP3 plug in. My last car was only the second to have had a CD player. And my wife just had to buy a used ebay purchase to get a 5 disk player for our home stereo system. Seems ironic to me that it is easier to get a record player now than it is to get a CD player for a home system.
 

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If you are an audiophile, then there is a noticeable difference in sound quality when comparing a CD, or even an old school phonograph, level of quality to a digital mp3.
I'm sorry, but I'm calling BS. Spoiler alert; music has been digital; regardless of format; since the early 80's.

Sound is subjective and I do have my favorites, but all things being equal there is no discernable sound difference between the mediums.

Environments are a different story. Cars are terrible environments for listening to music, that's why setting balance and fade, in my opinion, are the two most important settings in a car audio system. Not the medium of playback.

That being said, CD's are dead, stream your music. :)
 

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Rip your CDs with a computer and put em on a phone or MP3 player.
 

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All digital music formats are not equal. A 128 kilobytes per second mp3 recording cuts off a ton of the sound quality in order to cram the music into a small amount of digital storage for portability. Whereas a WAV or FLAC lossless digital format will take up a lot more memory, but will record CD quality sound.

I personally can only tell the difference with headphones on and in a quiet setting, so crappy mp3 recordings in the car work great. I would never rely on mp3 format to preserve CD music. Service streaming original copyright high quality music or XM satellite works great, but you are basically renting the music. I am over 40, so I still like to own stuff, even though I listen to XM 95% of the time anyway.
 

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All digital music formats are not equal. A 128 kilobytes per second mp3 recording cuts off a ton of the sound quality in order to cram the music into a small amount of digital storage for portability. Whereas a WAV or FLAC lossless digital format will take up a lot more memory, but will record CD quality sound.



I personally can only tell the difference with headphones on and in a quiet setting, so crappy mp3 recordings in the car work great. I would never rely on mp3 format to preserve CD music. Service streaming original copyright high quality music or XM satellite works great, but you are basically renting the music. I am over 40, so I still like to own stuff, even though I listen to XM 95% of the time anyway.
Not to mention streaming uses data
 

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All digital music formats are not equal. A 128 kilobytes per second mp3 recording cuts off a ton of the sound quality in order to cram the music into a small amount of digital storage for portability....
True. But nobody uses 128 kbps anymore, not since the early days of MP3. Most MP3 files these days are 320 kbps, which are almost indistinguishable from the actual recording, for all practical purposes, especially in the auto environment.
 
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