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I just got my impala about a month ago an someone tried stealing my rims but didn't get far. I didn't realize it until I got to work which is 5 minutes down the road. When I got out of the car I looked at my wheel (front driver side) because I did here something strange an noticed I was missing a lug, so I checked the rest an come to find out one of the studs is cross threaded so either I didn't noticed that when I bought the car or the thief tried putting it back on and cross threaded I'm not sure so I'm just trying to figure out if I can just replace the two studs or if u have to replace the whole wheel hub assembly.
 

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I just got my impala about a month ago an someone tried stealing my rims but didn't get far. I didn't realize it until I got to work which is 5 minutes down the road. When I got out of the car I looked at my wheel (front driver side) because I did here something strange an noticed I was missing a lug, so I checked the rest an come to find out one of the studs is cross threaded so either I didn't noticed that when I bought the car or the thief tried putting it back on and cross threaded I'm not sure so I'm just trying to figure out if I can just replace the two studs or if u have to replace the whole wheel hub assembly.
The studs are pressed in. If you can find the right removal tool, then yes, they are replaceable. But it might be easier and take less time to replace the whole hub assembly. Sorry to be cynical, but finding the right tool can be time consuming. And expensive, if you can't borrow it. Some folks might hammer it out, but I can't imagine that being harmless.

This web page shows the tool and how to use it, but quick searches at Autozone and Google have yet to find it.

https://www.familyhandyman.com/automotive/car-maintenance/how-to-replace-a-broken-wheel-stud/view-all#step1

What you might consider is getting a die and trying to clean up the threads. That requires getting the die perfectly aligned at the start, and that may not be possible. If it starts wrong, it will only make a mess.

In my experience, the studs are made of much harder steel than the nuts. So usually it's the lug nuts that strip rather than the studs.

If the stud threads are only damaged at the start, you can try putting a thread file on it to clean it up.

[Edit] The linked page indicates using a tie rod end puller to push out the stud. And that did get hits at Autozone.

HTH.

Doug

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I've done this on axled vehicles, it's a piece of cake.

You must heat the old stud to red with a torch, and it takes only a light
tap with a hammer, and the old stud falls out.

Heat ONLY the stud, with a big enough flame to do it quickly.

You could put a wet rag around the seal if you felt nervous abut getting heat to the seal.

I'd think even a muffler/brake shop could do this, for not much cash.

If you don't have access to a torch set-up, call around.
 

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Old ones are heated with a torch and smacked backwards out of the hub.
Carbide,

If it's only a couple whacks, I would agree. But I've seen these things scary tight.

I can't say I've never used a hammer on a car, but I do know a shop owner who confiscated all the hammers from his mechanics :)

Doug

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You could put a wet rag around the seal if you felt nervous abut getting heat to the seal.

I'd think even a muffler/brake shop could do this, for not much cash.
If the heat is well managed, I concur. But that is critical.

I replaced a pitman arm on my F150 a while back, and that seemed to be the number 1 cause of collateral damage - guys would fry the seal on the steering gearbox trying to heat the pitman arm to get if off.

A brake or muffler shop is a good idea.

Doug

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I went to see what advice youtube was giving, and everyone just gets a BFH and smacks them out.

I don't think I'd want my hub bearings to go thru that, but I bet that's how most anyone in the business is going to do it that way. An air impact hammer is probably better for the bearing than smacking it with a big friggin' hammer.

There can be interference issues on some vehicles, and either choosing a best wheel orientation position to remove the old and reinsert the new stud can be done on some vehicles, or slotting the dust shield and bending the tab down out of the way on others.

Some vehicles give you inadequate room to slip the flange past the hub mounting of the knuckle, and they've ground a flat on the flange of the stud away down to the stud's shank to clear the interference, and some new studs even come that way.

I'm not sure how many people have replaced just studs on these cars, as the hub assemblies themselves have such a poor failure rate that they get swapped out for new ones more often than I would have guessed.
 

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Looking at them, you should be able to replace the studs in these hubs.

Last time I replaced studs in a hub, I had to have them pressed at a parts store with a machine shop, cost was minimal and there was no damage done.
 
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