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As the title says the actuator is STILL clicking after replacing it twice. I’ve replaced both actuators behind the passenger dash an after the initial replacement after a couple days the clicking came back. After replacing the one that kept clicking again after just a couple days the clicking has returned. Has anyone else had this problem or know what else it could possible be?
 

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As the title says the actuator is STILL clicking after replacing it twice. I’ve replaced both actuators behind the passenger dash an after the initial replacement after a couple days the clicking came back. After replacing the one that kept clicking again after just a couple days the clicking has returned. Has anyone else had this problem or know what else it could possible be?


Year, make, model, and trim line (which would tell single or dual-zone HVAC system).would help others here.

Are you sure you replaced the defective actuator (and not another one that wasn’t bad)? After replacement, did you run the HVAC through the self-calibration?
 

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It’s a 2009 impala & not 100% sure on the trim. I’m pretty positive I replaced the bad actuator since I could feel it clicking after opening the glovebox to check which one was making the noise. No I did not, how would I go about doing that? Thanks you for the help
 

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It’s a 2009 impala & not 100% sure on the trim. I’m pretty positive I replaced the bad actuator since I could feel it clicking after opening the glovebox to check which one was making the noise. No I did not, how would I go about doing that? Thanks you for the help

There are two ways to force the HVAC system to do a self-calibration. One is to remove the HVAC fuse while the car is running (not sure which one on your car) - then reinstall it. This will cause the HVAC system to perform a self-calibration (note: do not touch the HVAC controls while the self-calibration is in operation - it takes about 1-2 minutes, and you may hear the HVAC system operate in different modes, such as fan increase / decrease, mode switches, etc.

You can also disconnect the battery negative cable for several minutes (engine off). Then reinstall it. This will then force the HVAC system into the self-calibration (as noted above). Note that if the check-engine light was on or there were any trouble codes stored, the battery disconnect will erase the codes.

The dealer can also use a GM Tech II device to force the self-calibration, but you would be charge for the work.
 

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There are a lot of posts on this forum about replacing the 8th generation HVAC system actuators. You may want to do a search, and spend some time reading the results. Some of the posts contained excellent photos and directions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Year, make, model, and trim line (which would tell single or dual-zone HVAC system).would help others here.

Are you sure you replaced the defective actuator (and not another one that wasn’t bad)? After replacement, did you run the HVAC through the self-calibration?
There are a lot of posts on this forum about replacing the 8th generation HVAC system actuators. You may want to do a search, and spend some time reading the results. Some of the posts contained excellent photos and directions.
There are two ways to force the HVAC system to do a self-calibration. One is to remove the HVAC fuse while the car is running (not sure which one on your car) - then reinstall it. This will cause the HVAC system to perform a self-calibration (note: do not touch the HVAC controls while the self-calibration is in operation - it takes about 1-2 minutes, and you may hear the HVAC system operate in different modes, such as fan increase / decrease, mode switches, etc.

You can also disconnect the battery negative cable for several minutes (engine off). Then reinstall it. This will then force the HVAC system into the self-calibration (as noted above). Note that if the check-engine light was on or there were any trouble codes stored, the battery disconnect will erase the codes.

The dealer can also use a GM Tech II device to force the self-calibration, but you would be charge for the work.
I just tried taking out the fuse while the car was running & it did the re calibration but afterwords I still had the problem. I also tried taking the negative terminal off for a little while and it seemed to do the re cal as well but again the problem was still there. I don’t know if it could be something that’s connected to the actuator or something entirely different.
 

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It is possible that you installed a defective (new) actuator, or the door that the actuator moves is stuck - causing the clicking noise (which is the actuator unable to move the door).

Is there enough room for your to remove the replacement actuator, then use a small pliers to move the door shaft (to see if it easily moves and is not stuck)?

Is your HVAC cabin air filter clean - can you remove it and use a flashlight to look inside the air inlet path (which leads to the blower cage)? Is is possible there is debris in the air path?
 
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