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Odometer doesn't light up and you can't tell what it says. i got this car for my son a few months ago and have worked through several other problems. i went through all the fuses thinking it may solve other problems too and none are blown. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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On the 03-07 Silverado pickups that's a symptom of cracked solder joints on some of the SMT resistors in the instrument cluster.
You can get them repaired.
 

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I wonder if it could be the dimmer switch; there are a lot of connections there. See if I can find a wiring diagram
 

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I couldn't find anything specific to the odometer. I just remember when I replaced my dimmer/headlight switch, things lit up that I never knew had lights. I took it apart and the terminals were all gunked up. If the PRNDL above the odometer is dark, maybe just the bulb.
 

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On the 03-07 Silverado pickups that's a symptom of cracked solder joints on some of the SMT resistors in the instrument cluster.
You can get them repaired.
Personally experienced this as well for my PRNDL disp. Removed Instrument cluster. disassembled the cluster and found multiple cracked solder joints....i mean at this point its all work that was done 20 years ago now being thats its a 2001 model year Sierra. Geez time flies. been a dependable truck to say the least.
I would venture to guess that these impala cluster's would be the same story in terms of disassembly no? I feel if youre confident enough with a soldering iron, it would be a simple repair IMO.
 

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Personally experienced this as well for my PRNDL disp. Removed Instrument cluster. disassembled the cluster and found multiple cracked solder joints....i mean at this point its all work that was done 20 years ago now being thats its a 2001 model year Sierra. Geez time flies. been a dependable truck to say the least.
I would venture to guess that these impala cluster's would be the same story in terms of disassembly no? I feel if youre confident enough with a soldering iron, it would be a simple repair IMO.
Should be similar to disassemble.
The hypothesis on the EEVBLOG forum is that the resistors run hot enough that they cause something similar to cold solder joints over time. Some of the early Lead free production methods left a lot to be desired as well.
60:40 Sn Pb .031 dia Kester 44 electronics solder and a decent rework flux like Amtech NC-559.
You want a soldering station with decent thermal control for the thin PC boards in these GM clusters. Some of the better inexpensive solder stations that use Hakko T12 tips are pretty versatile. Jeffescortx did a review of four of the better ones in the $75 US price range.
 

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Should be similar to disassemble.
The hypothesis on the EEVBLOG forum is that the resistors run hot enough that they cause something similar to cold solder joints over time. Some of the early Lead free production methods left a lot to be desired as well.
60:40 Sn Pb .031 dia Kester 44 electronics solder and a decent rework flux like Amtech NC-559.
You want a soldering station with decent thermal control for the thin PC boards in these GM clusters. Some of the better inexpensive solder stations that use Hakko T12 tips are pretty versatile. Jeffescortx did a review of four of the better ones in the $75 US price range.
have heard in my travel's that if youre doing circuit board repairs that Lead based solder is the way to go....now these days that might be hard to come by being that Rosin Core seems to be the crowd favorite for simple health reasons....were all going to die anyways why sacrifice the quality of the repair? To save a buck is beyond me, never pays dividends at all ever. Also have read many hypothesis' on the resistors operating at to high of temp due to the effects overtime that we have been presented with.
I second the recommendation of a soldering station if constant electrical repairs are happening in the shop. it just K.I.S.S, simple as that cant get around it. All that being said then, i will be honest i did not do research to the degree before performing my repair, my "soldering station" consisted of my Butane torch soldering iron from Power Probe that i acquired from Amazon for less then $80 to my door. then cleared off the top of my work bench, used a rubber mat for an isolator form the metal table top. RE-Heated the old solder and added a crumb sized amount of Rosin Core to each pin due to 90% of them being cracked decided not to take chances. once all soldering was complete i re-assembled the cluster and tested for functionality. must say its been flawless maybe even slightly brighter since the repair 6mo ago. i honestly recommend OP spends sometime on Youtube for the repair procedure to familiarize yourself with the cluster and what you might be potentially up against, acquire some economically friendly soldering tools and go to town. really really really basic repair with enough homework behind you, yes the board can be daunting to look at. but think of each line on the board as a wire that exposed and isolate to where the fault is located this will simplify the electrical circuit in your mind and make the repair less daunting.
Hope all this help OP, Wouldnt mind hearing how this turned out! all else fails these cars are plentiful at Pick n Pulls, could always use another cluster for parts as well... food for thought!
 

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Rosin flux core is electronics solder. It differentiated the milder chemicals in the hollow core of the solder when acid core solder was a lot more common. Lead and ROHS compliant lead free solders both have rosin cores.

Lead plumbing solder may be more difficult to source since it's illegal to use it on potable water pipes and The Borg don't sell it...
Good old fashioned Leaded Kester or your favorite brand of small diameter Tin/Lead Sn/Pb 60:40 electronics solder is still very easy to find.

Occasional soldering isn't going to expose you to enough lead to cause issues. Just use some common sense. Most of the lead will be on your fingers from handling the solder and cleaning the board. The smoke is burning flux not vaporized copper, lead, or tin.
Any metals are bad in high enough doses including Iron and we need that to survive.
Wash your dirty paws before eating and touching your clothes, face, or any other part of your body.
If you work with it every day and don't use your noggin for anything other than a hatrack then you might have issues.
The main reason for the ROHS regulations are to keep lead out of the landfills. We don't really recycle much of our electronics waste stream and it's poisoning the water and land in SouthEast Asia China and nearby Pacific island nations along with the plastics and other waste streams that are smuggled in and burned there rather than being recycled.

You definitely want to clean any flux off the board with Isopropyl Alcohol when the repairs are complete as it's tacky and will attract conductive crud along with being very mildly corrosive. I clean off the no-clean flux for that reason.
 
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