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My heater on my 2004 Chevy Impala doesn't work, it seems until I move the car. The blower works, it just doesn't blow hot air. Any ideas?
 

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Not really enough info here about your problem. If what you are describing is when you first start the car that you let it warm up a few minutes and then get in and go that it is cold, well that is normal. Cars sense the early 90's have not warmed up very fast on cold days.
Now if what you are describing is that when the car moves you get warm air and when it stops moving it gets cold again, then change either the thermostat or more likely the water pump.
Hope one of theses help. Please post if this is not what you mean about your cars problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
2004 Impala

My heater on my 2004 Chevy Impala doesn't work, it seems until I move the car. The blower works, it just doesn't blow hot air. Any ideas?
Actually the engine temp warms up fine, it warms up about 10 min. before it's driven but the heater blows cold air until it's driven down the road a few blocks, then it starts blowing warm air and seems to be fine then. It's like the heater core doesn't let hot water through until it's moving awhile.
 

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Actually the engine temp warms up fine, it warms up about 10 min. before it's driven but the heater blows cold air until it's driven down the road a few blocks, then it starts blowing warm air and seems to be fine then. It's like the heater core doesn't let hot water through until it's moving awhile.
If when you let it warm up 10 minutes and get in have you watched the temp gage and see if it warms up any more as you start to drive? I suspicion that it does get warmer as you first start driving. Being that the heater core is a small radiator and the outside air can be quite cold it may need more heat from the engine in order to be able to heat the air going into the cabin. During a warmer day you might try turning on the heat when the engine is cold and see when you get heat in the cabin where the gage reads. Of course it will take longer on a colder day to feel the same warmth from the heating system.
I use to work on aircraft and with those engines you could control the engine heat by the amount of fuel you gave it separate from the throttle. You could enrich the mixture (fuel to air ratio) or lean it. Enriching it would give more fuel and help it start when cold, and cool off the engine when it was hot (though you loose power), leaning it would allow the engine to heat up more, the trick is balancing the fuel to air mixture for the desired HP and engine temp.
Fuel injected cars do the same thing in a way, it gives the engine more fuel than air in order to start on the first cold start of the day (or after so many hours of not running), with the extra fuel and no load on the engine it won't heat up as efficiently as when it is driven. This extra fuel is need in order to start and run as the engine is cold. After the engine warms up then the computer reduces the fuel in order to bring the best fuel economy and power from the engine.
Might check your owners manual I believe that you will find that it recommends on a cold start to start and run the engine about 30 seconds to maybe a minute before moving the car. That really is all the time it needs to get the oil through out the engine and be ready to drive. Yes it will take a little longer for the engine to produce the heat for the heater core, but it should be doing it in about 4 to 5 minutes. You will also reduce your fuel bill by doing the car this way.
I don't think you have any problem right now, it seems that the coolant system is working fine and as designed. Anything other than your current description then I would be looking for a problem. If you still suspect a problem you might try running a coolant flush and back flushing the system, drain it, and then adding fresh coolant.
 
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