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post #1 of (permalink) Old 4 Weeks Ago Thread Starter
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Rust on bottom of doors.

Rust is starting to form at the seams on the bottom of the front doors in the middle between the drainage holes. Any ideas on how to clean the drainage holes and apply grease to slow the rusting process? It's about a 3ft gap between holes and air pressure or a stiff wire seem more problematic.

Also is it possible to reach the drainage area if the door panels are removed? And too extreme to even think about applying some type of grease in all the crevices inside the door panel? Thanks. 2012 LT
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Not too sure grease is the correct route. There is a latex-based product marketed under a number of different brands which is essentially a "chemical rust converter."

This is just one example (I have no affiliation with the product or manufacturer): https://www.permatex.com/products/sp...ust-treatment/
Search it on Youtube - plenty of videos showing how to apply and how it works.

Short version: you remove the loose rust and any dirt. Apply/dab to rusty surface with a paint brush; several light coats are better than one heavy one, in my experience. Allow to fully cure: rust will change color to black. Once dry, the surface can be primed and painted, if desired. This product chemically stops the rust from continuing. For door seams, you could also apply from inside the door. However, the product needs to be applied DIRECTLY TO THE RUST for it to work.

I used to live in the rust belt and fought the losing war with corrosion with many cars. This stuff evened the odds a little.

I would NOT do the grease idea you are proposing, especially if you think you would apply the rust converter later. It will NOT work on a greasy surface.

Best of luck.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2014LTDLTZ View Post
Not too sure grease is the correct route. There is a latex-based product marketed under a number of different brands which is essentially a "chemical rust converter."

This is just one example (I have no affiliation with the product or manufacturer): https://www.permatex.com/products/sp...ust-treatment/
Search it on Youtube - plenty of videos showing how to apply and how it works.

Short version: you remove the loose rust and any dirt. Apply/dab to rusty surface with a paint brush; several light coats are better than one heavy one, in my experience. Allow to fully cure: rust will change color to black. Once dry, the surface can be primed and painted, if desired. This product chemically stops the rust from continuing. For door seams, you could also apply from inside the door. However, the product needs to be applied DIRECTLY TO THE RUST for it to work.

I used to live in the rust belt and fought the losing war with corrosion with many cars. This stuff evened the odds a little.

I would NOT do the grease idea you are proposing, especially if you think you would apply the rust converter later. It will NOT work on a greasy surface.

Best of luck.
I would do what 2014ltdltz said about taking care of the rust you see on the outside but inside the doors where the sheet metal comes together your better off using "fluid film" oil under coating to prevent the rust from spreading any further. Of course this would have to be reapplied every year for the best protection. I have a co-worker that uses it every year, all over the common rust areas, and his 20 year old vehicle has very little rust on it.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart77 View Post
I would do what 2014ltdltz said about taking care of the rust you see on the outside but inside the doors where the sheet metal comes together your better off using "fluid film" oil under coating to prevent the rust from spreading any further. Of course this would have to be reapplied every year for the best protection. I have a co-worker that uses it every year, all over the common rust areas, and his 20 year old vehicle has very little rust on it.

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I've never used the oil product mentioned above, so no expereince to share there. However, I have successfully used spray-on undercoating inside doors when I lived in the rust belt. I also applied it over the cured rust converter product I mentioned further up. Applied it once and then forgot about it. To do an optimal job, I did pull the door panels off (best access), but I also successfully applied the stuff via the door drain holes using the undercoating manufacturer's "straw" spray adapter. The undercoating is basically a fairly fluid tar-like substance until it cures. If properly applied, I had great results with it. Caveat: when applying via the door drain holes, you really need to be able to "visualize" the inside of the door and where you are spraying to make certain you get complete coverage. Don't just shoot straight up and assume you got everything.

One last thing, it is a messy job (need lots of newspaper or a good tarp to catch the drops). It can take a day or two for the stuff to cure, too - especially depending upon temperature and ventilation.

You've got some options discussed here. Good luck.
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May also google/search: POR-15.
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