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Correct Tire Pressure?

Yesterday I had the dealer replace the original Goodyears with General Atltimax 43 tires. On the way home I noticed they were slightly hard riding.


I checked on the DIC and the Fronts are 35 psi and the rears are 34 psi.


The sticker on the door says front and backs should all be 30 psi.


Based on experience, is this a problem or a potential problem? Should I bring them all down to 30 psi?


Thank you.
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Did you check the DIC with tires "cold" or after some miles driven? Recommended 30psi is the "cold" pressure like the 1st start of the day in the morning. Or the car hasn't been driven for several hours.
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Originally Posted by 2016LimtedLTZ View Post
Yesterday I had the dealer replace the original Goodyears with General Atltimax 43 tires. On the way home I noticed they were slightly hard riding.


I checked on the DIC and the Fronts are 35 psi and the rears are 34 psi.


The sticker on the door says front and backs should all be 30 psi.


Based on experience, is this a problem or a potential problem? Should I bring them all down to 30 psi?


Thank you.

I would follow GMís cold tire inflation PSI recommendation. When you check the tire inflation pressures, had the car been driven for a while? When hot, tire pressures can increase 2-3 PSI over the cold tire pressure.
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Tire pressure is always a comfort vs. handling trade-off. There's no such thing as a universally correct tire pressure. Within reason, a little more pressure yields more responsive handling at the expense of ride comfort. Your priorities will determine the correct pressure for your car's tires. If the car feels a little too harsh to you and you're not concerned about maximizing handling, drop the inflation pressure a couple pounds to see if you like that better.

On Saturday, I had my local Discount Tire store perform the first rotation on my Michelins. The tech dropped the cold inflation pressure down to 30 psi all the way around, per the placard in the door jam. (I had been been running them at 34 psi.) With the inflation pressure reduction, the car is noticeably less harsh over bad pavement, but there's a little more slip angle in the steering. Since I prioritize handling, I may try 32 next time I air them up to see if I can live with that.


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Originally Posted by sheila View Post
Did you check the DIC with tires "cold" or after some miles driven? Recommended 30psi is the "cold" pressure like the 1st start of the day in the morning. Or the car hasn't been driven for several hours.
Definitely cold. Checked first thing this morning while the car was in the garag.
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Originally Posted by 1999 White C5 Coupe View Post
I would follow GMís cold tire inflation PSI recommendation. When you check the tire inflation pressures, had the car been driven for a while? When hot, tire pressures can increase 2-3 PSI over the cold tire pressure.
Definitely cold. It was sitting in the garage all night.
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Originally Posted by Tesla View Post

Tire pressure is always a comfort vs. handling trade-off. There's no such thing as a universally correct tire pressure. Within reason, a little more pressure yields more responsive handling at the expense of ride comfort. Your priorities will determine the correct pressure for your car's tires. If the car feels a little too harsh to you and you're not concerned about maximizing handling, drop the inflation pressure a couple pounds to see if you like that better.

On Saturday, I had my local Discount Tire store perform the first rotation on my Michelins. The tech dropped the cold inflation pressure down to 30 psi all the way around, per the placard in the door jam. (I had been been running them at 34 psi.) With the inflation pressure reduction, the car is noticeably less harsh over bad pavement, but there's a little more slip angle in the steering. Since I prioritize handling, I may try 32 next time I air them up to see if I can live with that.

Your experience is most helpful, especially since I have the identical car. Since I posted this inquiry earlier. I found some info on the General Tire website. They claim that over inflation can cause steering problems when turning. I guess it's a matter of degree of overinflation. Since you have had the experience on this car, I'll tweak my pressure based on what you described until I find the right pressure for this time of year, I always add some just before the winter sets in.It's amazing how much pressure I lose as the temperature gets closer to zero and sometimes below that.
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Originally Posted by 2016LimtedLTZ View Post
Your experience is most helpful, especially since I have the identical car. Since I posted this inquiry earlier. I found some info on the General Tire website. They claim that over inflation can cause steering problems when turning. I guess it's a matter of degree of overinflation. Since you have had the experience on this car, I'll tweak my pressure based on what you described until I find the right pressure for this time of year, I always add some just before the winter sets in.It's amazing how much pressure I lose as the temperature gets closer to zero and sometimes below that.

As a rule of thumb, air pressure in a tire will drop 1 PSI for every 10 degrees in ambient temperature (and increase when the temperature increases). I see you live in New York. I live in the Midwest, and see ambient temperatures range from about 10 below zero to 95+ degrees (Fahrenheit). I check tires pressures with the seasons, as well as monthly.

I have been driving for 50 years now (gave away my age...), and have owned many, many vehicles (passenger, vans, SUV, sportís cars, etc.). I have bought many sets of tires. I learned at a young age to check and maintain the tires. Tire quality has improved dramatically.

I have always checked my tire pressures as a matter of routine maintenance. The TPMS display readings used by GM are very good, and I have found them to always be within 1 PSI when using a high-quality tire gauge (and very convenient).

The advice given by Tesla was very good.

If you over-inflate your tires, they will wear unevenly in the center. Under inflated tires wear unevenly on the edges.

I really think the vehicle manufacturers recommend an optimum tire pressure setting for a variety of reasons - tire wear, noise, handling, suspension performance, etc.

Overinflated tires can overheat on long drives, just as under inflated tires can (even in cool ambient weather).

I think youíre on the right track to ask for advice and maintain your car. Good luck.
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Originally Posted by 2016LimtedLTZ View Post
Your experience is most helpful, especially since I have the identical car. Since I posted this inquiry earlier. I found some info on the General Tire website. They claim that over inflation can cause steering problems when turning. I guess it's a matter of degree of overinflation. Since you have had the experience on this car, I'll tweak my pressure based on what you described until I find the right pressure for this time of year, I always add some just before the winter sets in.It's amazing how much pressure I lose as the temperature gets closer to zero and sometimes below that.

Yep, when tire companies caution against over-inflation, they're talking about gross over-inflation, not a couple psi. Most cheap tire gauges will vary by that much, although your TPMS sensors should be better.

Excessive inflation pressures will cause the center of the tread to bow out, reducing shoulder contact with the road, which can be dangerous from a control standpoint. Braking distances will increase and steering response will decrease under those conditions. But that takes considerable over-inflation beyond the recommended pressure.

Incidentally, it's always a good policy to replace the TPMS sensors when you mount new tires. The batteries in those sensors will only last so long, so it's good insurance.


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Tesla, I agree with you on inflation, but disagree on TPMS battery life. At least with GM vehicles, I have always experienced at least 10 years of service.
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Tesla, I agree with you on inflation, but disagree on TPMS battery life. At least with GM vehicles, I have always experienced at least 10 years of service.

Ten years of battery life is outstanding. From what I've read, six to eight years is the average. Some don't get even that much time out of a set.

I didn't mean to imply that the batteries were at their end-of-life with every tire change, especially when replacing tires every couple years, only that it's cheap insurance to change them out when mounting new tires. Aside from the batteries, another consideration is that they're integrated with the valve stems, which are made of rubber that also degrades over time.

I doubt I need to change my oil filter at every drain interval either, but I do it anyway. At about $160 installed for a fresh set of good sensors, the cost is about the same as the road hazard warranty in which I also always invest - and had to use for one of these Michelins before it was 3 months old. For me, the peace of mind is worth more than the cost.

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Tesla, I agree with you on inflation, but disagree on TPMS battery life. At least with GM vehicles, I have always experienced at least 10 years of service.

I purchased a new 1999 Corvette in September 1998. The original tire pressure monitor sensors lasted until 2016, and the vehicle had about 60,xxx miles on it. The vehicle was stored every winter in an unheated garage (Midwest - cold winters). The GM service manual said to expect 10 years of life from the sealed sensors (non replaceable battery).

All four sensors failed within four weeks of each other. The OEM GM sensors were more than $100 each (plus installation). I would never replace them prematurely due to the cost and effort.

If / when a TPMS sensor fails, the driver can manually check the tire pressure with a tire pressure gauge until the sensor is replaced.

I had the original tires replaced on my 2014 Impala 2LTZ (purchased new) at about 32,xxx miles with new Michelin tires - as the original were not wearing well, and were beginning to slip on wet pavement. I did not replace the TPMS sensors and they are still working fine.
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When I put my new Michelin Premier AS tires on I couldn't believe how much smoother they rode than the old Goodyears, and they had put 34PSI in them, I reduced that to 32PSI and they felt about the same as when they had 34.
I thought about putting the GM recommended 30PSI in but that seemed so low to me and I'm very happy with the handling/smooth ride/good gas mileage mix at 32 so I think I'll stay at that.
As far as smooth ride I think that has a lot more to do with the brand/model of tire than 2 or 4 PSI, I prioritized a smooth quiet ride vs handling when researching tires because for me that's a lot more important than how many G forces they get on a skid pad.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1999 White C5 Coupe View Post
As a rule of thumb, air pressure in a tire will drop 1 PSI for every 10 degrees in ambient temperature (and increase when the temperature increases). I see you live in New York. I live in the Midwest, and see ambient temperatures range from about 10 below zero to 95+ degrees (Fahrenheit). I check tires pressures with the seasons, as well as monthly.

I have been driving for 50 years now (gave away my age...), and have owned many, many vehicles (passenger, vans, SUV, sportís cars, etc.). I have bought many sets of tires. I learned at a young age to check and maintain the tires. Tire quality has improved dramatically.

I have always checked my tire pressures as a matter of routine maintenance. The TPMS display readings used by GM are very good, and I have found them to always be within 1 PSI when using a high-quality tire gauge (and very convenient).

The advice given by Tesla was very good.

If you over-inflate your tires, they will wear unevenly in the center. Under inflated tires wear unevenly on the edges.

I really think the vehicle manufacturers recommend an optimum tire pressure setting for a variety of reasons - tire wear, noise, handling, suspension performance, etc.

Overinflated tires can overheat on long drives, just as under inflated tires can (even in cool ambient weather).

I think youíre on the right track to ask for advice and maintain your car. Good luck.
Thank you. Most helpful. I too am a seasoned citizen (started driving in 1960). All these years I've been trying to find out numbers to define Overinflated and Underinflated for the reasons you cite. I will follow TESLAS example as the best way to address it.
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